Book Review of Dragonwatch by Brandon Mull

Dragonwatch (Book #1) by Brandon Mull

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Dragonwatch (Book #1) by Brandon Mull

My kids and I were so excited to hear that Brandon Mull would be writing a break-off series to Fablehaven! As soon as this book came out, we had it in our hands. And they all read it. And they all read it again. “Mom! You need to read Dragonwatch!” “Mom, why haven’t you read it yet?” “Mom, when are you going to read Dragonwatch?” So, here I am, finally getting around to reading it. Just in time because I get to review book #2 very soon! So…drumroll please…I (finally) present my book review of Dragonwatch by Brandon Mull.

Blurb:

 

“In the Hidden Dragon sanctuary of Wyrmroost, Celebrant the Just, King of the Dragons, plots his revenge. He has long seen the sanctuaries as prisons, and he wants nothing more than to overthrow his captors and return the world to the Age of Dragons, when he and his kind reigned without borders. The time has come to break free and reclaim his power.

No other person is capable of stopping Celebrant and his dragon horde. It will take the ancient order of Dragonwatch to save the world from destruction. Long ago, Dragonwatch was a group of wizards, enchantresses, dragon slayers, and others who confined the majority of dragons into sanctuaries. But nearly all of the original Dragonwatch members are gone, and so the wizard Agad reaches out to Grandpa Sorenson for help. As Kendra and Seth confront this new danger, they must draw upon all their skills, talents, and knowledge to battle against forces with superior supernatural powers and breathtaking magical abilities.

How will the epic dragon showdown end? Will dragons overthrow humans and change the world as we know it?”

My Book Review:

I’m so excited to get to spend more time with Seth and Kendra! I have to admit that I really hoped Brandon Mull would write more about them! This adventure is a bit overwhelming for them, but I’m sure they’ll live up to the challenge! I love that Seth is still Seth. He’s curious, mischievous, a boy, and has a difficult time listening to (and following) instructions. Sometimes this works to his benefit, but other times it gets him in big trouble.

Kendra is more relatable because she is more like me: a rule follower. I cringe every time Seth talks or walks or gets an idea. Kendra, on the other hand, reminds me a little too much of me. She can be a little bossy (this for sure doesn’t describe me at all—just so you know), kind of a know-it-all, and she follows the rules with exactness. It’s interesting to see how these qualities benefit her, but they can also sometimes, just sometimes hinder her. I like that she is a strong character, though, and she isn’t afraid to speak her mind. Even if it’s to a big, scary dragon!

There are a few new characters in this book, and my favorite of the new characters is the Tiny Hero. He is awesome. Henrick the alcetaur is also pretty cool. I didn’t even know what an alcetaur was, do you? He’s like a centaur, but he has the body of a moose. There you go, you learned something today! The Somber Knight is…yep, you guessed it—somber!  

This book is so fun! Seth and Kendra have a huge task ahead of them, but they have good attitudes, are willing to work hard, and they are very brave. I like that they need to do it together. They each have a role to play, and they are very good at those roles. I like that they each have time to shine individually as well as together. The book is well written and so much fun. I loved the challenges they faced, and the solutions they came up with.

It does kind of follow the same pattern as the Fablehaven books, but that’s not really a complaint because I liked those a lot. If you enjoyed Fablehaven, you will definitely enjoy Dragonwatch! I highly recommend both series, especially for middle-graders and early YA. Oh yeah, and anyone who loves a fun story! I just have one question: when does book #2 come out? Oh yeah…next week! Stay tuned next week for my review of Dragonwatch book #2!!

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (There isn’t any profanity or “intimacy.” There’s not really any violence either. There is an angry dragon, but he doesn’t hurt anyone in this book.)

Age Recommendation: Middle Graders (4th-6th) and up

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2RbkvsF

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Fablehaven book #1 by Brandon Mull fablehaven book of imagination  caretakers guide to fablehaven
 
 
Featured Image Credit: Goodreads.com

Book Review of Fablehaven (Book #1) by Brandon Mull

fablehaven book #1 by Brandon Mull
I have to admit that this one took me awhile to get into. I didn’t love it at first. However, I think it has a lot of potential! My friend told me I have to read book #2 and that I’ll for sure be hooked after I read that one. I’ll let you know. I do think it’s an interesting and unique concept, and I’m interested to see what happens to Kendra and Seth later on in the series.
 

Blurb:

“For centuries mystical creatures were gathered into a hidden refuge called Fablehaven to prevent their extinction. The sanctuary is one of the last strongholds of true magic. Enchanting? Absolutely. Exciting? You bet. Safe? Well, actually, quite the opposite…Kendra and her brother, Seth, have no idea that their grandfather is the current caretaker of Fablehaven.
 
Inside the gated woods, ancient laws keep order among greedy trolls, mischievous satyrs, plotting witches, spiteful imps, and jealous fairies. However, when the rules get broken, powerful forces of evil are unleashed, and Kendra and her brother must face the greatest challenge of their lives to save their family, Fablehaven, and perhaps the world.”
 

My Book Review:

I liked this book, but I didn’t love it. It was good and entertaining, but it didn’t capture me from the beginning. It didn’t seem “real,” which is funny because it’s fantasy, but that’s how I felt. It was good, clean reading, and it would be a good read-aloud for younger children. I do know some people that LOVED this book, so it may just be me. I think I will read the rest of the series because I know my children will want to read them and I like to preview books before they read them.  I would recommend it for when you want to read a book and don’t really want to think, just be entertained.

It is an interesting concept that fantastical beings are all around us, but we can’t see them. We see butterflies instead of fairies, goats instead of satyrs, and so forth. Hmmm…what else is out there that we’re missing out on? Kendra and Seth are good characters, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. I definitely relate more to Kendra because she is a rule follower like me. The character development is well done, and I like the uniqueness of the story.

Content Rating PGContent Rating: PG (There are a few kind of scary parts and some gory parts. There isn’t any profanity or “physical intimacy.”)

Age Recommendation: Middle Graders (4th-6th) and up. It would be a fun read-aloud for 2nd-3rd graders too.

My Rating: 3/5

3 Star Rating

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2PQZWRW

 

      Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

      Janitors (Book #1) by Tyler Whitesides   Adventurers Wanted: Slathbog's Gold (Book #1) by M.L. Forman   Alcatraz vs The Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson

 

This book review was first published on 4/5/10. Updated on 10/22/18.

Book Review of The Storyteller’s Secret by Sejal Badani

The Storyteller's Secret by Sejal Badani

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Storyteller's Secret by Sejal Badani

I do not know much about India or Indian culture, even though I have a sister-in-law that is Indian. I should know more, but I don’t, unfortunately. When I was asked to read this book I got excited because I thought it would be fun to read more about it. There is a modern-day story set against a story from the past, and how they come together may determine the future. I hope you enjoy my book review of The Storyteller’s Secret by Sejal Badani.

Blurb:

“Nothing prepares Jaya, a New York journalist, for the heartbreak of her third miscarriage and the slow unraveling of her marriage in its wake. Desperate to assuage her deep anguish, she decides to go to India to uncover answers to her family’s past.

Intoxicated by the sights, smells, and sounds she experiences, Jaya becomes an eager student of the culture. But it is Ravi—her grandmother’s former servant and trusted confidant—who reveals the resilience, struggles, secret love, and tragic fall of Jaya’s pioneering grandmother during the British occupation. Through her courageous grandmother’s arrestingly romantic and heart-wrenching story, Jaya discovers the legacy bequeathed to her and a strength that, until now, she never knew was possible.”

My Book Review:

Learning of Jaya’s heartbreaking miscarriage and subsequent demise of her marriage grasps at the heartstrings. I have four children now, but have experienced miscarriage, and it’s so hard. And I could see how not knowing your family’s past would probably make you feel like a part of you was missing. I thought her abrupt decision to travel to India was a knee-jerk reaction, but if you can, why not?

Jaya is a good character. She’s well written and usually realistic. She is quick to react and slow to recover, but I do know a few people like that. Ravi is an interesting character. As the reader you really feel for him in the beginning because life isn’t fair in his circumstances. Amisha’s character is interesting. Sometimes I got her and sometimes I didn’t. Some of her choices made me cringe.

While I was reading this book, I was enthralled. I loved the writing style and got sucked right into the story. Both Jaya and Amisha were mostly relatable and sympathetic. I also enjoyed learning about India now and India during the British occupation. Learning about the caste system intrigued me and made me want to know more about it. I read the book very quickly and loved it.

Then I started thinking about it. In the moment I didn’t really think through some things because I was so enthralled. After, though, as I thought about a few of the situations and events, they didn’t make a lot of sense. There were some big inconsistencies throughout the book. Technology seemed to come and go, the caste system also seemed to come and go, and certain improprieties were completely disregarded.

Then there was the ending. I did not like the ending. There were several ways the author could have gone, and this one was my least favorite. I thought it was presumptuous and unrealistic. I, honestly, couldn’t picture it happening that way. I was so sad because I had enjoyed the rest of the book. Overall, I loved this book in the moment. The writing just sucks you right in. After I thought about it for a few days I realized that there were some inconsistencies, but I still liked it. I didn’t love the ending, but life doesn’t always take the turn you want it to, so it was ok.

Content Rating RRating: R (There’s not really any profanity, but there are a few “intimacy” scenes. Some of them are more descriptive than others. There is a little bit of violence with beatings and domestic violence.)

Recommendation: Adult

My Rating: 3.5/5

 

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2CtcCKT

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

The Lost Family by Jenna Blum Lilli de Jong by Janet Benton  Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
 

Spotlight on Coding Club by Michelle Schusterman

Spotlight on Coding Club by Michelle Schusterman

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Girls Who Code: Spotlight on Coding Club by Michelle Schusterman

I have a 13 year-old daughter that loves coding. She’s taking a creative coding class at school and loves it! So I have been thrilled to be able to review the books in the Girls Who Code series. I’m so glad they’re putting an emphasis on girls and coding. The books, if nothing else, are great at spotlighting some amazing things that coding can do. They make it seem so fun and “cool” (Does anyone even use that word anymore, or am I dating myself here?). These girls are normal, cute girls who play softball, dance karaoke, have real problems, and love to code. They do such fun things with coding! I hope you enjoy my book review of Girls Who Code: Spotlight on Coding Club by Michelle Schusterman.

Blurb:

“Erin knows that she is a star, and this could be her big break. With the talent show coming up at school, she will have the chance to take center stage with a stellar performance and help behind the scenes, too, with the coding that will make it all happen.

But Erin has a secret: She has anxiety. And when things start piling up at home and school, she has a harder time pretending that everything is okay. Her friends from coding club have always been there for her in the past, but she has never told them what is really going on. With the spotlight on coding club and more pressure on the team than ever before, will this be their final blow?”

My Book Review:

This is a really cute book. I seriously love how fun and awesome they make coding sound! And they also make it sound fairly easy. I mean, if they can do such fun stuff in junior high, then it must not be too hard, right? I don’t know coding at all. At all. I know as a blogger I shouldn’t admit that, but it’s true! So I like that it makes coding a little more accessible in my mind. I think it will have the same effect on the YA girls reading this book.

The book is well written. I like the writing style and the character development. Erin, especially, is well developed and realistic. She thinks things I know I thought way back in junior high. I like how realistic she is. She definitely has her struggles, and I think that’s great for the girls who will be reading this to see. I especially like the focus on anxiety.

Over the past year and a half I have come to know a lot about anxiety in teenagers, and I know it’s a lot more common than most people think it is.  It’s high past time that we talk about it and get it out in the open. Maybe a YA girl reading this book, who has anxiety, will seek help when she sees Erin getting help. Or maybe she’ll at least gain the confidence to talk to her parents about it. I really liked that side story of the book because it is so pertinent to these kids.

The story is realistic with a school-wide talent show. I think it’s a fun back drop to talk about amazing things that coding can do. I loved how all the technology came together, and I could totally see a high school coding class putting something like this together. What a great learning experience for the girls in the coding club! I love how they all put their personal touch on everything.

This is such a fun series, and I am glad there is a focus on girls and technology. I think a lot of girls will benefit from this book and series. Hopefully it will spark an interest in coding in some more girls!  

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13 (There are a couple of places the girls say, “Ohmygod,” which is a swear word in some homes. There is a homosexual character, and it is briefly discussed.)

Recommendation: YA and up

My Rating: 3.5/5

3.5 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2RMSecX

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Girls Who Code: Lights, Music, Code! (Book #3) by Jo Whittenmore Girls Who Code: Crack the Code by Sarah Hutt  
 

Book Review of Squint by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown

Squint by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Squint by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown

I have worn glasses since second grade, and contacts since seventh grade. Pretty much, I don’t remember a time when I didn’t need glasses to see. I’ve never been made fun of or teased because of my glasses, thankfully, but the cover of this book totally had me curious! I loved Mustaches For Maddie, so when I saw that Squint was written by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown I knew I needed to read it. And I’m so glad I did. They have become quite the duo!

Blurb:

“Flint loves to draw. In fact, he’s furiously trying to finish his comic book so he can be the youngest winner of the ‘Find a Comic Star’ contest. He’s also rushing to finish because he has keratoconus—an eye disease that could eventually make him blind.

McKell is the new girl at school and immediately hangs with the popular kids. Except McKell’s not a fan of the way her friends treat this boy they call ‘Squint.’ He seems nice and really talented. He draws awesome pictures of superheroes. McKell wants to get to know him, but is it worth the risk? What if her friends catch her hanging with the kid who squints all the time?

McKell has a hidden talent of her own but doesn’t share it for fear of being judged. Her terminally ill brother, Danny, challenges McKell to share her love of poetry and songwriting. Flint seems like someone she could trust. Someone who would never laugh at her. Someone who is as good and brave as the superhero in Flint’s comic book.

Squint is the inspiring story of two new friends dealing with their own challenges, who learn to trust each other, believe in themselves, and begin to truly see what matters most.”

My Book Review:

What a great book! As I stated above, I love the way that Chad Morris and Shelly Brown write together. The voice in their stories just draws you in. It’s so real. It is full of emotion, expectations, and energy. It’s easy to read and understand, and yet it has an underlying depth to it. Although it’s not all rainbows and unicorns, it has such a positive feeling to it. The voice fits the characters and situations in the book perfectly.

This book feels similar to Wonder by R.J. Palacio. There are some similarities there as well. Flint, the main character, has a disability and the kids at school make fun of him, tease him, and stay away from him. Then someone is brave enough to look past the thick glasses and quirky habits. McKell wants to fit in with the popular crowd, but she doesn’t like how they treat Flint, also known as Squint. Her brother gives her these challenges to do, and since she’s afraid that the popular crowd will make fun of her for doing them, she asks Squint to accompany and help her.

Squint is not used to people actually paying attention to him and being nice to him. At first he doesn’t trust McKell because he expects it all to be a prank. But then it’s not. She genuinely wants to be with him. Now, she may still want to also be a part of the popular gang, but she makes it clear to Squint that she doesn’t like how they treat him. She’s nice, caring, talented, friendly, and kind. She has the ability to look past the glasses and quirks to find the real Flint.

Flint is also a great character. He used to be normal like everyone else. He played football, had friends, and could see perfectly. Then one day he began losing his eyesight. The diagnosis was keratoconus. It’s an eye disease. This is how Flint explains it in the book:

“It’s called keratoconus,” I said. “It’s not like super rare or anything. There may even be someone else in the school with it, but mine is pretty bad. Well, really bad. My corneas are getting thinner and thinner, and that makes my eyes bulge. It’s like the windshield of my eye to too weak to hold its shape ball…It makes everything look a bit like a funhouse mirror.”

I won’t complain about my poor eyesight after reading about Flint’s disease!

I think it’s great how Chad Morris and Shelly Brown use their books to bring attention to different situations in people’s lives. The more we talk, the more we realize how similar we are. The more books kids can read about how being different is ok, the better. If kids can read more books on how to treat people, the better off we’ll all be. We like to think we’re different. We’re unique, for sure. But we’re the same. We all want to fit in, have friends, be loved, and not be made fun of or teased. I think everyone wants to feel safe and acknowledged. It’s the relationships and the connections that matter.

I love books that teach such valuable lessons in such a great way. It’s a great reminder for readers of all ages that how we treat people is important. Everyone has a story. Everyone is fighting a battle. Some battles are front and center while others are more hidden. Learning to look past differences and see the real person behind the façade is a skill we can all improve in. Learning to accept and love despite differences is also something needed today. Also, there are always two sides to every story. Many times we get caught up in our own thoughts and feelings, and forget that others are involved, and they have feelings too. Thank you Chad and Shelly for writing stories that inspire, teach, and uplift!  

Content Rating PGRating: PG (It’s clean, but there is some minor violence with fights, mean words, and bullies.)

Recommendation: Middle Graders (4th-6th) and up

My Rating: 4.5/5

4.5 Star Rating

 

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2y9OCsu

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

mustaches for maddie Wonder by R.J. Palacio  the hundred dresses
 

My Review of Little Women Movie

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

My Review of the Little Women Movie

I have read Little Women by Louisa May Alcott many times. It’s one of those books that I keep going back to over and over. I love the characters and the relationships in the story. Although it’s a sad story, I never leave the book feeling depressed or distraught. The overarching theme is inspiring and uplifting. Family and friendships are important. Everyone is different and has her own goals and dreams. We all make mistakes, but that is how we grow and learn. Is is possible for a movie to capture those feelings without becoming too cheesy? Could an adaptation ever do the book justice? Find out in my review of the Little Women movie. 
 

Blurb:

 
Fans of Louisa May Alcott’s timeless classic, Little Women, will love the modern retelling of the timeless family story. 
 
LITTLE WOMEN is a celebration of the female voice and the bond of sisterhood. Opens nationwide on September 28th

 

My Movie Review:

As I previously stated, Little Women is one of my all-time favorite books. I’ve read it many times throughout my life; I read it a few times in my youth, and I’ve read it every few years since. It never gets old. I love the writing, the characters, the story, and i love the feelings and relationships portrayed in the book. Wow! I had high expectations for this movie! 

I was so excited to be invited to the premiere event! I’ve never been to anything like that, but it was very fun. I went with my mom, and we ended up having great seats. We sat behind all the older sister actresses (there were also darling actresses that played the sisters when they were younger).  After the movie was over, some of the cast and crew did a question and answer session, and I enjoyed that as well. It was fun to hear about their experiences.

So did the movie live up to my expectations? I have to admit that I was skeptical when I found out that it was an adaptation, but I think it turned out to be a good thing. If you try and recreate the original, you’re going to have a hard time meeting expectations, but if you go with an adaptation, it’s different. As a reader (or viewer), you know it’s going to be a little different, so you’re not expecting the original, if that makes sense. I thought they did an excellent job of bringing the story into the 21st century and yet staying true to the story. 

The script was well written and did stay true to the original story. I thought the actresses and actors were well chosen and did a great job. A friend told me that she thought Jo was over-acted and cheesy, but I disagree. In my mind, Jo is a dramatic person. It is all about her, and she isn’t afraid to let everyone know that. Jo kind of over-acts her own life, I think, and so I thought the actress did a good job of capturing her essence. I thought the other characters also did a good job portraying the sisters and family members. Each one showed the qualities and characteristics that I have come to love in each of the sisters. 

The sets and scenery were beautiful! My favorite place was the attic room that the sisters shared. I want that attic in my house! It is amazing. It’s almost exactly how I pictured it. And the girls’ castles were darling. 

 

I was a bit skeptical at the beginning of the movie, but by the end it had turned into just a cute film. It is a little cheesy, but so is the book. I mean, it’s all about their lives and their dreams. The girls love to act out plays in the attic, they have their Pickwick club where they tell their grievances, and anything like that nowadays will seem a bit cheesy on film. This movie is way better than a Hallmark film. I really liked it. I loved the emotion and the feelings because they do feel just like the book does. It’s most likely a girls night out movie; my husband probably wouldn’t want to go see it. I’d say go see it, though! It’s a cute show, and if you like the book then you’ll enjoy the movie!

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13

(I did think this was a good rating. There isn’t any profanity, but there is a scene where two teenagers are kissing, and the boy wants to take it farther than the girl does. She starts to feel uncomfortable and asks him to stop. He does stop and then walks away. There is also the death of a main character.)

Age Recommendation: YA (13) and up

(I almost took my 13 year-old daughter with me. If she had been there, we would have had a good conversation after about saying no and meaning it. It would have made me a little uncomfortable to have her see it, but it didn’t go farther than her saying no, so that was good.)

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

little women the secret garden 
 
 

Review of Promises and Primroses by Josi S. Kilpack

Promises and Primroses by Josi Kilpack

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Promises and Primroses by Josi S. Kilpack

I always get excited when I hear that Josi Kilpack has another book out! She has such a fun writing style, and is good at allowing the reader into the hearts and minds of her characters. She has written about a wide variety of characters in different settings, and they always seem to become some of my best friends. When I heard about this new book I may have done a little happy dance. The cover art is beautiful, the title is fun with alliteration, and I couldn’t wait to meet the characters and delve into this world of primroses. So what did I think? Find out in my book review of Promises and Primroses by Josi S. Kilpack.

Blurb:

“Lord Elliott Mayfield has done his best to take care of his family, first his siblings and now his nieces and nephews. Unfortunately, he sees this new generation moving in the same direction of bad matches and scandalous relationships as the last. In hopes to change their course, he establishes a ‘marriage campaign’ to motivate them to improve themselves through making respectable matches. With his heart in the right place, what could possibly go wrong?

Peter, Elliott’s eldest nephew, thinks the entire idea is ridiculous. A widower with two young daughters, he simply needs a governess, not a wife. Julia Hollingsworth certainly has the credentials and the experience, but is altogether too young and pretty for such a job. So why can’t he stop thinking about her?

Julia loves working as a governess, despite the objections of her mother, Amelia. And as it turns out, Amelia has a lot to say about the Mayfield men—none of it good. But Julia dismisses the rumors of ruined reputations and instead concentrates on helping Peter with his children and his fledgling business in canine husbandry. His kindness and gentleness is endearing—and increasingly attractive.

But Amelia, whose heart was broken thirty years ago by none other than Elliott Mayfield, is determined to prevent any relationship from blooming either between Peter and Julia—or between herself and Elliott.

Hearts and history collide as both couples must face their pasts and decide if risking it all is worth the promise of new love and a new future.”

My Book Review:

Hahaha! Can you imagine your uncle coming to you and proposing that he will give you a very large gift (money or something else) if you decide to settle down and get married to a respectable person? I have to admit that it might be tempting–as long as I already had a fiancée. It might be a little weird otherwise. People just don’t talk like this anymore. Of course parents want their children to marry good people, but thankfully it’s not the same as it used to be. Again, thankfully, women have a lot more options now than they did back then. I’m so glad that times have changed on that one!

I love Julia’s character. She’s so sweet and tenderhearted. I loved how cute she was with the little girls in the story. It was fun to read about the tea parties, the games, and the love she had for them. I liked that she thought independently, she didn’t care what her mother thought, and she did what she thought was best for herself. After learning about Julia’s mother, I don’t blame her for wanting to get out from her mother’s thumb.

Peter seems like a good man. He may be a little too blinded to see what’s important sometimes, but I think he has good intentions. It was interesting learning about the dogs and some of the care that went into them. I know that scandals in families still happen, but thankfully, I don’t think they affect the whole family for generations like they used to. Peter worked very hard to prove himself despite his family’s reputation, and I liked that he put that effort into rising above his circumstances.

I liked the easy-going writing style of this book. It’s well written, has great character development, and is a sweet story. I did think it was a bit predictable and a little cheesy in parts, but honestly, that’s what I want in a romance. Right? Love stories need a little cheese and a few “awwww” moments! It’s fun and entertaining, and I enjoyed it. I liked how it all came together, and how the characters fit together in the story. It’s a fast, easy read; I read it in a couple of days, and loved that I could get sucked into this fun world of promises and primroses.    

Content Rating GContent Rating: G (It’s clean! There’s no profanity, violence, or “intimacy,” except for a few brief kisses.)

Age Recommendation: YA and up

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Promises and Primroses Blog Tour

 

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2QO44D2

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

A Heart Revealed by Josi S. Kilpack The Lady of the Lakes by Josi S. Kilpack  Forever and Forever by Josi S. Kilpack
 

Book Review of Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard

Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard

I have to admit that I have been naïve. I’ve heard of things going on, but I always thought that it couldn’t really be true. People can’t really be that evil, right? It only happens in the movies, right? Unfortunately, it does happen. Too often. And not necessarily in some faraway land; it’s happening all over the world. Children and women are being sold into slavery. But this slavery is a different kind of slavery from what we’ve learned and studied about. These women and children are being sold, yes sold, into human trafficking. It’s absolutely horrifying. Find out more in my book review of Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard.

Blurb:

“In the 1800s American South, Harriet Jacobs is enslaved and tormented by a cruel master. He relentlessly attempts to force her into [an intimate] union, and, when rebuffed, he separates her from her children and spends a lifetime trying to coerce her and then recapture her when she escapes to freedom. Jacobs outwits her tormentor and eventually reunites with her children, works in the cause of abolition and reform, and helps newly freed slaves with education and aftercare.

In 2009, Timothy Ballard encounters a grieving father in Haiti whose three-year-old son has been kidnapped and sold into slavery along with thousands of children who were orphaned after an earthquake devastated the country. He pledges to track down the missing child and leaves his job at the Department of Homeland Security to establish Operation Underground Railroad to infiltrate black markets in human trafficking, liberate victims, and provide a comprehensive aftercare process involving justice and rehabilitation for survivors.

Slave Stealers alternates these two riveting stories, weaving them together to expose the persistent evil of trafficking and sexual exploitation that has existed for centuries—and inspiring us to find a way to end it. Filled with heartbreaks and triumphs, miracles and disappointments, hair-raising escapes and daring rescues, this gripping book provides insight to this terrible evil and the good that can be done when caring people step up and stand in the light.”

My Book Review:

Wow. I read this book in two days. I couldn’t put it down. It pulls at every piece of humanity, motherhood, teacher, Christian, and sister that I have. And then some. I’ve read quite a bit about slavery and the Civil War, and I’m astonished every time by the brutality and inhumane treatment that the slaves endured. It’s incomprehensible. And then I learn that it’s happening today. Yes, today. And not in some place far, far away, but way too close to home. It may look slightly different, but there are many similarities between the transatlantic slavery of old and modern-day slavery.

I loved how Timothy Ballard wove the two stories together. It was seamless. It was powerful. Like everyone, I’ve heard of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglas. I have learned about Abraham Lincoln and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Unfortunately for me, I have not been as well acquainted with Harriet Jacobs. What a story! I loved hearing her story and learning about her. She was an amazing woman who inspires me to never give up, to stand up for my beliefs, and to take a stand against slavery.

Timothy Ballard also has an amazing story. He has seen and experienced so much. I also enjoyed learning about his story. He is such a good example of being a good citizen, of being compassionate, and of being aware of the needs of others. I love that he has dedicated his life to resurrecting the Underground Railroad. He uses many of the same principles today that the people who ran the original Underground Railroad used in the 1800s. His writing style just sucks you into the story. It brings the story to life.

Although old and modern-day slavery are heavy topics, Timothy Ballard does a great job of pulling out the inspirational moments. Instead of feeling weighed down and depressed after reading this book, I absolutely felt inspired. I want to help. I cannot imagine what those children and women have to endure, and Mr. Ballard has such a way with words that he broaches hard things and turns them into teaching moments. His writing is full of energy, it’s authentic, and it is bold. He doesn’t mince words, but it’s not off-putting; in fact, it has the opposite effect.

I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know the modern-day conductors of the Underground Railroad. Their stories are also powerful and vulnerable. It’s very telling how highly Mr. Ballard thinks of them. Once again, it’s inspiring to hear what many of them have overcome, and how they have reacted to those heartbreaking situations.

I loved this book so much! I’m so glad that I had the opportunity to read and review it. I highly recommend Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard.

Content Rating RRating: R (There isn’t any profanity in this book, but it’s discussing human trafficking and the sexual exploitation of children. It is full of adult themes.)

Recommendation: Adult

My Rating: 4.5/5

4.5 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2xdnE2P

 

Slave Stealers Blog Tour

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Women of the Blue and Gray by Marianne Monson Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand  the immortal life of henrietta lacks
 

Review of Six Sisters’ Stuff Copycat Cooking Cookbook

Copycat Cooking by Six Sisters' Stuff

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Copycat Cooking by Six Sisters' Stuff

I have reviewed a few of the Six Sisters’ Stuff cookbooks, and I have favorite recipes from each one. Their recipes are usually easy to prepare, turn out great, and I most likely have all the ingredients in my pantry. I’m super excited for this one because it includes some of my favorite restaurant dishes. You know, the ones where you’re saying, “I could make this!” And then you don’t because you’re really not sure how to? Well, they’ve got you covered! Without further ado, I introduce you to your new favorite cookbook: Copycat Cooking by Six Sisters’ Stuff.
 

Blurb:

 
“The popular Six Sisters’ Stuff bloggers come to the rescue with a new collection of more than 100 easy-to-make recipes of popular restaurant dishes and take-out favorites for busy families.
 
With more than fifty recipes that you can make in 30 minutes or less, this cookbook can help you make meal planning a breeze as you  mix-and-match side dishes from one restaurant with main courses from another and finish it off with a dessert from a third.
 
Save money while spending more time with your family. Change dining-out to dining-in for a memorable experience your whole family will enjoy.
 
Includes copycat recipes for Texas Roadhouse Cactus Blossom, Panda Express Orange Chicken, Olive Garden Chicken Parmesan, Disneyland Monte Cristo Sandwich, Chili’s Molton Hot Lava Cake, Sprinkles Red Velvet Cupcakes, and Universal Studios Butterbeer. “

 

My Book Review:

Ummmm……yummy! I’m so excited for this cookbook! It has recipes for some of my favorite restaurant dishes. And you know what? They’re actually doable! I could make these! They’re not too time consuming, they don’t have a million tricky steps, and they include ingredients that I can pronounce. I have most of the ingredients in my pantry already, or I know which isle they’re on in the the grocery store. It’s so refreshing to find good, easy recipes that my family will love and that I can actually prepare.

Here are some of my favorites (photo credits: amazon.com):

 

Mmmmmm!!! I love me some Olive Garden Chicken Parmesan! I can’t wait to try this one! And look, only five ingredients. I can handle this one! This is my husband’s favorite dish at Olive Garden, so he’ll be very excited!

 

Although I’ve never tried Disneyland’s Dole Whip Floats, I’ve heard they’re amazing. This one will be fun! I’ve never tried this Freckled Lemonade either, but I LOVE strawberry lemonade so I can’t wait to try it.

 

Chili’s Molten Lava Cake is one of my favorite restaurant desserts. Seriously. It’s sooooo good!!! I love how the melty chocolate and the ice cream melt together. Mmmmmm! This is making me hungry and it’s 7:30 in the morning! Now I need a chocolate fix. I’ll need to make this dessert this weekend!

As you can see, the Six Sisters have done it again! Copycat Cooking by Six Sisters’ Stuff is a fun, practical, and delicious cookbook that will make your whole family happy. Even the picky eaters will find new favorites. If those pics didn’t convince you, how about a few of these:

  • Ghirardelli Hot Chocolate
  • Chick-Fil-A Frosted Lemonade (One of my favorites!)
  • Nestlé Tollhouse Cookie Pie
  • The Cheesecake Factory Oreo Dream Cheesecake (Yes, please!)
  •  Cafe Rio Steak Salad
  • Applebee’s Honey Grilled Salmon
  • Kneaders Chicken Bacon Avocado Sandwich
  • Olive Garden Zuppa Toscana
  • Disneyland Clam Chowder

And the list goes on and on and on… Need I say more? This would be a fantastic birthday or bridal shower gift, or just a fun addition to your cookbook collection. We’ll be having fun with this one for a long time!

Want to buy Copycat Cooking by Six Sisters’ Stuff? Click on the image:

Content Rating GRating: G 

Recommendation: Everyone from the littlest chefs to the professional ones!

My Rating: 4.5/5

4.5 Star Rating

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

 Six-Sisters-Stuff-A-Year-with Six-Sisters-Stuff  celebrate-every-season-six-sisters-325x325
 
 

Book Review of The Caseroom by Kate Hunter

The Caseroom by Kate Hunter

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Caseroom by Kate Hunter

Wow! Two books about 19th century Scotland in two days! And to make it even better, it’s also two strong, female Scottish women in two days as well. After reading these two books I know more about the situation of women in 19th century Scotland than I ever thought I would. These two women live very different lives, but their fight for women at that time makes them one in cause. Once again, I’m thankful for women like Iza and Jess that paved the way for the rights women have today. What was Iza’s story? Find out in my book review of The Caseroom by Kate Hunter.

Blurb:

“Set in the thick of workers’ lives in Edinburgh’s thriving print industry, The Caseroom follows Iza into the arcane world of the caseroom where she learns the intricacies of a highly-skilled trade.

As one of some 800 Edinburgh women who for a few decades did so, she becomes a hand-typesetter, work that had been, and was to become once more, a male preserve. Despite hostility to the cheap labour that women represent, Iza persists in work that allows her to feed her imagination on books. But holding on to her trade means hardening herself to the needs of those she loves. And when the men’s union moves to eliminate women from the caseroom and a We Women movement forms to oppose them, there is no middle ground. Torn between class and gender loyalties and embroiled in a bitter labour dispute, Iza must choose sides.”

My Book Review:

In all honesty, before I read this book I had never heard of a caseroom. I had no idea what it was or what it was used for. Oops! You’d think someone who loves to read and proofread would know some of the history of printing. But, no. Everything about the caseroom was new to me. I didn’t know what any of the tools were or what they were used for. The names of the different jobs there were also brand new to me. Needless to say, I learned a lot from this book.

I liked the writing style of the The Caseroom, and I thought it was well written. Most of the characters were well developed and seemed realistic. I couldn’t decide how I felt about Iza. Sometimes I liked her a lot, and sometimes she bothered me. That sometimes happens in real life, though, I suppose. I did admire her for her bravery in standing up for women’s rights. Just working in the caseroom was enough to make some of the men angry, including her brother. She persevered, though. Even without her brother’s blessing she went to work. I loved her determined attitude.

Iza’s family seemed, for the most part, like a good family. They had their problems, but seemed to usually work them out. Each of the family members brought a unique angle to the story.  I also liked her co-workers Netta and Margaret. Roddy Mac was a character that I never trusted or liked, for some reason.

I liked that this story was based on “the author’s father’s family history.” The story happens to be “based on real events and features some actual historical characters.” I think that it’d be fun to write a story about my ancestor’s lives.

The one thing that was hard for me with this book was the language. The author uses terms for things that I’m assuming were appropriate for the time period. I guess it’s a good thing, but consequently, I didn’t understand a lot of the book. Even my Kindle couldn’t define the words, so that’s not a good sign. I think it would be a great story for people who know the language a little better than I do.

Content Rating RContent Rating: R (Profanity, including at least one “f” word. “Intimacy,” including scenes and innuendos. A couple of characters died.)

Age Recommendation: Adult

My Rating: 3/5

3 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2Pk6tnz

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

The False Men by Mhairead MacLeod The Lost Family by Jenna Blum  A Bridge Across the Ocean by Susan Meissner