The Milkman’s Son by Randy Lindsay

The Milkman's Son by Randy Lindsay

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Milkman's Son by Randy Lindsay

Have you ever felt like you’re the odd-one-out in your family; or been teased that you’re the milkman’s child? Or, have you ever tried your hand at family history work? Randy Lindsay did both, and it didn’t turn out quite like he expected. DNA testing has been able to do amazing things with family history, including finding links to people you never knew you were related to. It’s been so helpful, in fact, that it has been known to find a few surprises in families around the world. Randy Lindsay’s family tree had a big surprise waiting for him! Find out more in my review of The Milkman’s Son by Randy Lindsay.

Blurb:

“Raised in a family he bore little resemblance to, Randy was jokingly referred to as ‘the milkman’s son.’  This warm and candid memoir chronicles the unraveling of a family secret, which begins with Randy’s dad having dreams about deceased relatives urging him to complete their family tree. Randy agrees to help with the genealogy, but after his searching leads to a dead end, he takes a commercially available DNA test. The results reveal a possible genetic match to a sister, which begins a familial quest that forever changes the author’s life.

Featuring a cast of vivid characters, richly drawn from two distinct families, The Milkman’s Son reveals one man’s family tree, pulling back layers of new information as he gets closer to the truth—a biological father, siblings, and family members he never knew about.

This is a story of accepting, forgiving, reuniting, and, most importantly, it’s about the bonds that connect us and the unconditional love that makes us feel like we belong.”

My Book Review:

This story is crazy! It’s one of those stories where you’re thinking, “You can’t make this stuff up!” Lindsay’s writing draws you in from the beginning. His writing style is easy to read, casual, and has a good amount of humor in it. It’s easy to get lost in this story because it flows well, it holds your attention, and you have to know more. What? What happens next? You found out what??

At the beginning of the book I wasn’t sure if I’d care about some unknown person’s family tree, but I did! I think I cared because of Lindsay’s writing. I loved the humor he added. Lindsay draws you in, and you feel like you’re a branch on his family tree. You care for the people he discusses; you cry with him, laugh with him, and are just as shocked as he is at some of the surprises he finds.

One thing I really wanted to know more about was his mother. That part of the story remains a mystery, and I think her side of the story is important. Not knowing her side definitely left a hole in the story. She would have been able to answer a whole bunch of my questions. 

My siblings are really good at family history. I find it fascinating, but I haven’t put as much time and effort in as they have. On my dad’s side, we can only go back as far as my great-great grandfather, and then the line stops. We, too, are now delving into the land of DNA to see if it helps. I hope we don’t find too many surprises along the way!

I enjoyed this book. It’s quite the story! I think it will inspire a few people to look into their family history because of the way Lindsay describes it, and because of his surprises. You’ll enjoy this book even if you’re not into family history at all.

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (This book is pretty clean. There isn’t any profanity or violence. There isn’t any “intimacy,” but there is a situation that is implied.)

Recommendation: YA+

My Rating: 3/5

3 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2yXxsCN

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand The Immortal Llife of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
 

Her Quiet Revolution by Marianne Monson

Her Quiet Revolution by Marianne Monson

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Her Quiet Revolution by Marianne Monson

I have lived in Utah my entire life, and I had never heard of Martha Hughes Cannon until I read this book. Why? Why don’t they teach about people like her when we learn about our state’s history? It makes me wonder who else I haven’t learned about. What other people (women and men) are out there hidden in history that have made contributions to our society and we don’t even know it? Who else is out there that has done extraordinary things and has been passed over in the history books? Her Quiet Revolution is a historical fiction/biography of Martha Hughes Cannon. I’m not quite sure which genre to put it in. It’s fiction, but it’s based on Martha Hughes Cannon’s life. Marianne Monson included many relationships and events from Cannon’s life, but needed to add a little fiction when the truth wasn’t readily available.
 

Blurb:

A novel based on the life of Martha Hughes Cannon, a pioneer woman who overcame tremendous odds.


When her baby sister and her father die on the pioneer trail to Salt Lake City, Mattie is determined to become a healer. But her chosen road isn’t an easy one as she faces roadblocks common to Victorian women. Fighting gender bias, geographic location, and mountains of self-doubt, Mattie pushed herself to become more than the world would have her be, only to have everything she’s accomplished called into question when she meets the love of her life: Angus Cannon, a prominent Mormon leader and polygamist.

From the American Frontier to European coasts, Martha’s path takes her on a life journey that is almost stranger than fiction as she learns to navigate a world run by men. But heartache isn’t far behind, and she learns that knowing who you are and being willing to stand up for what you believe in is what truly defines a person.

Her Quiet Revolution is the story of one woman’s determination to change her world, and the path she forged for others to follow.”

My Book Review:

As I read this book I couldn’t help but notice how much I take for granted as a woman living in the United States of America today. Yesterday was the primary election in my state, and I had the privilege of voting for the candidate I think should be the president of the United States of America. I graduated from college with a degree in elementary education, and no one questioned my skills or abilities. 29 sixth graders now call me their teacher. Thankfully, I don’t have to wear a dress to work every day. With my husband I own a home and a car. I get to drive wherever I want to, and whenever I want to—without a chaperone. I have rights, freedoms, and liberty.

Many women that have gone before me have not had these privileges, and many still do not have them today. I’m thankful to people like John Hancock, John Adams, Harriet Tubman, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and Martha Hughes Cannon (I could name 100 more…) who have had the courage to see a different, better, and more equal path ahead.

I really enjoyed this book. I loved learning about Martha Hughes Cannon’s life. There’s also some history of the state of Utah, and of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, of which I am a member. Some of the history I knew previously, and some I did not. Ms. Monson did a great job of bringing the three pieces together into a story that seamlessly wove together.

Martha (Mattie) was an amazing woman. She serves as an example to everyone, especially women. At a time when women going to college were frowned upon, she didn’t care. She went anyway. Mattie endured a lot to get her medical degree. I loved how she also went on to improve her oratory skills as well. I am not going to go into her whole life here; for that you need to read the book. Suffice it to say that she accomplished many things and endured some rough trials in her lifetime. Martha Hughes Cannon paved the way for women in the United States of America to go to college, become doctors, vote, and serve as public servants.

The book is very well written. The writing style draws you into Mattie’s life, feelings, emotions, dreams, passions, and pain. The characters are well developed, realistic, and become your friends along the way. It’s obvious that Ms. Monson spent a lot of time researching this book. Her hard work pays off, for sure. I learned so much, but I also came away with questions of my own that I’d like to do more research on. There were some practices (like polygamy) that were stopped completely long ago, and others (like women healing the sick) that have somehow been forgotten along the way. I’d like to look more into the latter.

Whether or not you are from Utah, and whether or not you are a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, you will enjoy learning about Martha Hughes Cannon. She may have been from Utah, but her legacy pertains to all women. The way she stood up to her trials and plowed right over them inspires me to be and do better. At a time when women did not go to college, she did. When women were not doctors, she was.

Mattie worked hard and stood up to disappointment, taunts and jeers, and unbelievers. Society really has come a long way in accepting that women are capable of being doctors, senators, scientists, and more—thank goodness! It may not be perfect yet, but we’ve come a long way. I’m thankful to those who sacrificed to bring us this far.

I think the title perfectly describes this book, and the cover art is beautiful and inviting. I really enjoyed this book. It’s an inspiring story of a woman who worked hard and followed her dreams. Martha Hughes Cannon definitely led a quiet revolution that overturned the erroneous stereotypes and misgivings of many people. Her quiet contribution helped pave the way for women everywhere to achieve their dreams.

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13 (There isn’t any profanity, violence, or “intimacy.” Some of the themes are geared toward older readers and would be a bit too much for younger readers.)

Recommendation: Young Adult+

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/38nqouW

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

the immortal life of henrietta lacks Focused by Noelle Pikus Pace 
 
 

Book Review of Promised by Leah Garriott

Promised by Leah Garriott

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Promised by Leah Garriott

Can you believe it’s already February? What? Where did January go? Believe me, I’m NOT complaining—January seems to never end, so it’s a pleasant surprise. Since it’s the month of love, love is in the air, and Cupid is out full-force this month, I thought reviewing a proper romance would be a great way to start the month. Let’s get the love party started! Promised by Leah Garriott is a fun, new proper romance. Leah Garriott is a new author, and I have to say, I’m impressed! I’m excited to add her to the growing list of proper romance authors. Find out more in my book review of Promised by Leah Garriott.

Blurb:

“Margaret Brinton keeps her promises, and the one she is most determined to keep is the promise to protect her heart.

Warwickshire, England, 1812

Fooled by love once before, Margaret vows never to be played the fool again. To keep her vow, she attends a notorious matchmaking party intent on securing the perfect marital match: a union of convenience to someone who could never affect her heart. She discovers a man who exceeds all her hopes in the handsome and obliging rake Mr. Northam.

There’s only one problem. His meddling cousin, Lord Williams, won’t leave Margaret alone. Condescending and high-handed, Lord Williams lectures and insults her. When she refuses to give heed to his counsel, he single-handedly ruins Margaret’s chances for making a good match—to his cousin or anyone else. With no reason to remain at the party, Margaret returns home to discover her father has promised her hand in marriage—to Lord Williams.

Under no condition will Margaret consent to marrying such an odious man. Yet as Lord Williams inserts himself into her everyday life, interrupting her family games and following her on morning walks, winning the good opinion of her siblings and proving himself intelligent and even kind, Margaret is forced to realize that Lord Williams is exactly the type of man she’d hoped to marry before she’d learned how much love hurt. When paths diverge and her time with Lord Williams ends, Margaret is faced with her ultimate choice: keep the promises that protect her or break free of them for one more chance at love. Either way, she fears her heart will lose.”

My Book Review:

One of the reasons I enjoy reading proper romances is that I don’t need to worry about the content. It’s clean. One of the consequences of this is that the writing can sometimes be a bit too cheesy. Now, I like a good bit of cheese with my romance, but there have been a few times in which it has been too much. Promised does not have this problem. Yes, it definitely has enough cheese to make it a romance, but not enough to overdo it.

Leah Garriott’s writing style sucks you right into 1812. I pictured myself with Margaret at the ball, at home walking around her beloved lake, and I felt her emotions as she did. Garriott’s writing has wit and humor along with the somberness needed at times. The characters come to life on the page; their development allows for them to be realistic and relatable. Although Margaret drove me crazy at times, I still felt as though she were a dear friend.

Lord Williams and Mr. Northam each showed their true colors and were well written. Margaret’s brother Daniel, and her parents, were also realistic and well developed. I loved the emotions I felt from the characters. Margaret, especially, exudes emotion. She’s quite the spit-fire! I love how she takes life by the horns; even when she thinks there is no hope, she still tries with all her might to change unchangeable outcomes. Margaret also has some messed-up views of marriage and love. Thankfully, those get worked out along the way!

This book is easy to read, it flows well, and it’s such a fun story. Oh, don’t worry, it’s not all butterflies and roses, but it’s such a sweet love story. I truly enjoyed this book. It’s a fun, entertaining, and perfect addition to the proper romance collection. If you have enjoyed previous proper romances, you’ll love Promised by Leah Garriott!      

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (It’s clean except for some brief kissing.)

Age Recommendation: YA+

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2S9T8RW

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

 Promises and Primroses by Josi Kilpack A Song for the Stars by Ilima Todd
 
 
 

The Candy Cane Caper by Josi S. Kilpack

The Candy Cane Caper by Josi S Kilpack

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Candy Cane Caper by Josi S. Kilpack

Yay! I am so excited that Sadie is back! I’ve fully enjoyed reading Josi Kilpack’s proper romances, but it’s a fun change of pace to get back to Sadie and her mystery-solving skills. Christmas, though? Uhhh…not quite ready for that. I guess I should get ready though, since it’s supposed to snow tonight (ugh…).  I have read a few of Josi Kilpack’s culinary mysteries and have enjoyed them, so when I had the chance to review The Candy Cane Caper I jumped on it. I’m so glad I did.

Blurb:

“This Christmas, Sadie Hoffmiller Cunningham is making a list and checking it twice. For the first time since she and Pete married five years ago, their combined families are gathering for the holidays in Fort Collins, Colorado, for a party that would make Santa and Mrs. Claus proud. She just has to bake the famous Cunningham Candy Cane Cake, make sure the looming snowstorm doesn’t derail everyone’s travel plans, and oh, yes, solve one teensy-tiny mystery before the big day.

At ninety-four and nearly blind, Mary, Sadie’s friend and neighbor, knows this will be her last Christmas. When Sadie learns that someone has stolen antique Christmas ornaments from Mary’s tree, she vows to find the thief, no matter what. The ornaments had been appraised at more than $40,000, but they were worth even more to Mary, who had intended to bequeath them to her great-granddaughter, Joy, as a final gift.

With Pete in Arizona wrapping up a case of his own, it’s up to Sadie to question the residents of Nicholas House, where Mary lives, and deduce who had the means and the motive to steal heirloom ornaments during what should be the most wonderful time of the year. When stories of other thefts surface, Sadie feels like she’s creating a “naughty” list that could rival Santa’s. Identifying the thief, recovering the ornaments, and restoring them to Mary’s tree in time will take a Christmas miracle—and maybe a few extra-special cookies.”

My Book Review:

Someday I want to be more like Sadie. I want to bake delicious cookies and desserts for people, be a little more brave and bold, and serve others like she does. Sadie is a fun character. She has a good, strong voice, and is a tough cookie. Yep, I totally just made that pun. Haha! She’s a little tough on the outside, but she has a very soft center. I love how much she cares about other people. She may not choose the best ways to show it sometimes (you need to read the part about her in the auto parts store—cringe worthy for sure), but she definitely cares.

Sadie is well developed, well written, and realistic. She’s a little cheesy sometimes, but then she breaks into something and makes up for it. Some of her choices are a little iffy at times, but it’s all in the name of solving the mystery. I loved learning about Joy and her story, and Mary is such a sweetheart. I hadn’t ever heard of any of the fancy ornaments Mary had, so I had to look some of them up. Wow. They put my ornaments to shame.

The story line is a little predictable, but I enjoyed the journey. I enjoyed watching Sadie make a fool of herself at the mall, and I enjoyed reading all about the relationship she has with Mary. One thing you know will be good in a Josi Kilpack culinary mystery are the recipes. There are some great ones for sure. I can’t wait to try the Candy Cane Cake. It sounds so good!

If you’re looking for a fun, entertaining holiday (or not) read, look no further. The Candy Cane Caper by Josi S. Kilpack will make you laugh, cry, cringe, and feel hungry for sweets all in one tidy package. The ending is super cute; it’s a little cheesy, but I liked it. If you’ve like her previous mysteries, you need to read The Candy Cane Caper by Josi S. Kilpack!

Candy Cane Blog Tour Image

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (There isn’t any profanity, violence, or “intimacy” in this book. There might be a few teeny tiny laws broken, though.)

Age Recommendation: YA and up

My Rating: 3.5/5

3.5 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2qUWcYd

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Lemon Tart by Josi S. Kilpack Daisies and Devotion by Josi S Kilpack Cover Art Promises and Primroses by Josi Kilpack
 

Glass Slippers, Ever After, and Me by Julie Wright

Glass Slippers Ever After and Me by Julie Wright

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Glass Slippers, Ever After, and Me by Julie Wright

Glass Slippers Blog Tour Image UpdatedI have read a few of Julie Wright’s proper romances, and they’re so fun. When I heard she had written a new one, I had to get my hands on it! I couldn’t wait to read it. Thankfully, I get to review Glass Slippers, Ever After, and Me—that’s even better than just reading it. I love the cover art on this book! The colors are so fun, and when you add the rose petals and the fancy shmancy heels, it looks like a fairy tale waiting to happen. The title is super cute too!

Blurb:

Can the fairy tale bring Charlotte the happiness she’s looking for, or was he always there to begin with?

A modern, reimagined Cinderella story.

When aspiring author Charlotte Kingsley finally gets published, she thinks all her dreams have come true. But the trouble begins when her publicity firm reinvents her quirky online presence into a perfectly curated dream life. Gone are the days of sweatpant posts and ice cream binges with her best friend, Anders, replaced instead with beautiful clothes, orchestrated selfies, and no boyfriend. Only, that carefully curated fairy tale life is ruining her self-esteem and making her feel like a fraud.

When a bestselling author takes Charlotte under her wing—almost like a fairy godmother—she helps Charlotte see the beautiful person she already is and the worth of being authentic. But is it too late to save her relationship with Anders? The clock is quickly ticking towards midnight, and Charlotte must decide between her fairy tale life and the man she loves, before he’s gone forever.

My Book Review:

I loved this book! One of the things Julie Wright does very well is giving characters a voice. Charlotte’s voice in this story definitely makes the book. I love her spunk and her realness. One of my favorite scenes happens at the beginning when Charlotte feels quite upset and eats a couple cartons of ice cream. Yep! She’s my kind of gal! Ice cream is for sure a great go-to comfort food when you’re down.  I love Charlotte’s enthusiasm toward her writing, and especially her reaction to rejection letters. Haha! Her reaction to meeting her favorite author also makes for a fun scene. She makes such a great character.

I like that Charlotte is a strong character. She has her flaws, for sure, but she’s so well developed, real, and relatable. I could definitely see myself hanging out, watching movies, and eating ice cream with my bestie Charlotte. Anders also makes a great character. He’s such a nice guy with a big heart. He, too, is well developed, real, and relatable. I love his romantic flair. Don’t tell my husband, but he could use a few lessons on romance from Anders. Of course, we’ve been married for 21 years and they’re just beginning to date—it’s only a little different.

The story line in this book is so fun. A writer (Julie Wright) writes about a young, struggling writer (Charlotte Kingsley). I love the concept. I wonder if any of the experiences Charlotte had mirror experiences that Julie Wright had when she first started her writing career. That would be a fun question to ask her, for sure.

I didn’t love the characters of Charlotte’s mom and step-dad, or the way they treated her and her sister. They’re not as likable or relatable as Charlotte, Anders, and Kat are. They do, however, add contrast to the story. They give the reader context and background information about Charlotte and Kat, and you can see why the girls are the way they are in some ways. Charlotte’s team of editor, publicist, and social media people also add another dimension to the story. You want to like and hate them at the same time.

I felt bad for Charlotte because she wanted success so badly that she was willing to give up some of herself in order to do it. It’s a hard lesson to learn, for sure. As an outsider, I wanted to scream at Charlotte a few times. I could see where it was all heading, and it didn’t look pretty. It’s one of those things that I’d rather learn as the reader rather than the participator, for sure!

I really enjoyed this book! If you like proper romances, fun love stories, fairy tales, or any of Julie Wright’s other books, you will love Glass Slippers, Ever After, and Me.

Glass Slippers Blog Tour Image

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (There isn’t any profanity, violence, or “intimacy,” except some brief kissing.)

Age Recommendation: YA and up

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2IV5ol8

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Lies Jane Austen Told Me by Julie Wright Lies, Love, and Breakfast at Tiffany's by Julie Wright Check Me Out by Becca Wilhite
 
 

The Lady and the Highwayman by Sarah M. Eden

The Lady and the Highwayman by Sarah M. Eden

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Lady and the Highwayman by Sarah M. Eden

I love it when a book takes you somewhere you’ve never been, and never knew you wanted to! You don’t know what you don’t know, right? I had never heard of Penny Dreadfuls until I read this book. In case you don’t know what they are (because I didn’t), they were sensationalized stories printed on cheap paper in the United Kingdom in the nineteenth century. The story would be sold in parts, with each part costing one penny. These stories were quite popular with the young men of the time. When I say sensationalized, I mean that they were more fantastical, involving characters like ghosts and vampires. Who knew, right? Now you know! These Penny Dreadfuls play a major part in The Lady and the Highwayman by Sarah M. Eden.

Blurb:

“Elizabeth Black is the headmistress of a girls’ school and a well-respected author of ‘silver-fork’ novels. But by night, she writes the Penny Dreadfuls that are all the rage among the working-class men under the pseudonym, Charles King.

Fletcher Walker began life as a street urchin, but is now the most successful author in the Penny Dreadful market, that is until Charles King. Determined to find the elusive Mr. King, Fletcher approaches Miss Black. Elizabeth agrees to help if only to insure her secret identity is never discovered.

What neither author anticipated was the instant attraction. It’s upper-class against working-class, author against author, where readers, reputations, and romance are all on the line.

  • A historical romance set in London, England in the 1830s. This Victorian time period was well-known for its gothic romances and ‘Penny Dreadfuls’—cheap sensational fiction read by young, working-class men. The Guardian described them as ‘Britain’s first taste of mass-produced pop culture for the young.’ With more than a million sold each week, they contributed to the growing fear of crime in mid-Victorian Britain.
  • Though Penny Dreadfuls were known for their tales of crimes, exploits, and supernatural beasts, the Highwayman heroes were popular for the story’s romantic elements.
  • The story drew its inspiration from the real-life Victorian author Elizabeth Caroline Grey, a high-class lady, who, it was rumored, wrote both ‘silver-fork’ novels and Penny Dreadfuls.”

My Book Review:

This book is so fun! I didn’t know anything about Penny Dreadfuls when I began reading, and now I feel like an expert. I completely got sucked into the story, the life, and the time period. The characters, especially, draw you into their lives. Each character is well written, developed, and so unique. Fletcher—oh Fletcher. He just might make you swoon if you’re not careful! And I love Elizabeth’s complexity. Her secret life makes you want to, well…find a cool secret life! Nothing too crazy. Does book blogging count as a secret life when you’re a sixth grade teacher? Probably not. It’s not cool enough. I’ll need to think about it for awhile.

The uniqueness of the story draws you in. All the members of the “Dread Penny Society,” and their cause, remind me a lot of today’s Tim Ballard and Operation Underground Railroad. It’s hard to think of a better cause to support! I loved watching their operations take place, and knowing the lives they saved. The only thing that was a bit off for me was that I kept wanting to read “Dead Poets Society” instead of “Dread Penny Society.” The former is one of my all-time favorite movies. That’s just me, though.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book! The characters come to life on the pages, and they draw you into their lives and stories. There’s a lot of wit, which I love. I like the relationship between Elizabeth and Fletcher, and I like how the “Penny Dreadfuls” stories play into the plot. There are also some great causes highlighted like education and help for the poor and needy. Of course I love the tension and the romance as well!  

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (Some minor violence and kissing)

Age Recommendation: Young Adult

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/31G3wnY

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Ashes on the Moor by Sarah M. Eden Longing for Home by Sarah M. Eden
 
 
 

Six Ingredients with Six Sisters’ Stuff

Six-Ingredients-with-Six-Sisters-Stuff

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Six Ingredients with Six Sisters' Stuff

My style of cooking on busy weeknights usually includes scrambled eggs, grilled cheese sandwiches, quesadillas, or tacos. Tacos and a salad bar are about as fancy as I get on weeknights because they’re so busy. Like many families, I teach during the day. Then in the evenings the kids have dance, mountain biking, and sewing. Plus, they have weekly church activities on top of all that. There’s not a lot of time for fancy meals. However, with this new cookbook Six Ingredients with Six Sisters’ Stuff, that may change! My family will be so happy. The recipes only have six ingredients—I can do this!

Blurb:

“With only six ingredients or less per recipe, making dinner has never been easier.

Six Sisters’ Stuff is one of the most popular blogs for quick and easy cooking and entertaining at home for families. In their eighth cookbook, they tackle how to master meals for any cook with any skill level with more than 100 easy recipes made with incredible flavor combinations from just six ingredients or less.

From beginning cooks learning the basics to busy parents looking to save time in the kitchen, this cookbook is loaded with entrees, side dishes, and desserts. Whether it’s a one-pot wings dish or a no-bake peanut butter bar this cookbook is a fool-proof solution to meal planning and features ‘Kid Favorites’ recipes.”

My Book Review:

I have quite a few of the Six Sisters’ cookbooks, and I use recipes from all of them. They’re great recipes. I like them because they usually use ingredients you have on hand, and they taste good too. What I like about this new cookbook is that each recipe only has six ingredients. I went through the cookbook and it’s true—six ingredients or less. And they’re not crazy ingredients. It’s all stuff you probably already have, or you use often.

One feature that I love in this cookbook is the little “kid approved” hand that appears on many of the recipes. Basically, it means that kids have tried and liked those recipes. Yes! It’s always good to have a few go-to kid friendly recipes when you have picky eaters. Sadly, my picky eater won’t eat a few of them, like the Easy Baked Gnocchi, because they have sauce on them. Yep, she won’t eat ANY kind of sauce. Ugh. I think most kids will, though.

I like the colors in this cookbook. The green is so calming, for some reason. The photographs of the food are well done. They’re clear, bright, and look delicious! I like the layout and think it’s easy to read and follow. They make it easy to find everything with a table of contents at the front and a good index at the back. The recipes are also divided into “Main Dishes,” “Side Dishes,” and “Desserts.” I have a digital copy of the book, so I bet the paper copy is even better!

So, let me tell you about a few of my favorite recipes:

Ground Beef Enchilada Casserole looks and sounds so good! I don’t make enchiladas very often because of the time it takes to put them together. This recipe makes it super easy to do in casserole form.    

Six Sisters' Stuff Ground Beef Enchilada Casserole

Slow Cooker Ritz Chicken is very similar to poppy seed chicken, which is one of my family’s favorites. The only difference is that there aren’t poppy seeds on top of the Ritz crackers. We love this! I’ve never made it in the crockpot, so I’ll give it a try! I love a good crockpot recipe!

Six Sisters' Stuff Slow Cooker Ritz Chicken

Lemon and Dill Salmon. Yum! I love salmon. I don’t make it often. Okay, I’ve never actually made it. I love to eat it at restaurants, but I’ve never made it at home. That will change I hope, because this looks so good!

Six Sisters' Stuff Lemon and Dill Salmon

The Green Chile Rice sounds amazing! It will go perfect with any Mexican dish. I can’t wait to try it.

Six Sisters' Stuff Green Chile Rice

No-Bake Coconut Bars. Seriously? These look sooooo delicious! Like your own homemade Mounds Bar. They look so easy, too! Mmmmmm.

Six Sisters' Stuff No Bake Coconut Bars

Six Ingredients - Blog Tour

Content Rating GContent Rating: G (Clean!)

Recommendation: Everyone

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2NX7SDd

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Copycat Cooking by Six Sisters' Stuff Six-Sisters-Stuff Six-Sisters-Stuff-A-Year-with
 
Pictures of the recipes taken from the digital copy of the Six Ingredients with Six Sisters’ Stuff cookbook. They are for review only. Please do not copy or use them for any reason.

Bill Marriott: Success is Never Final by Dale Van Atta

Bill-Marriott by Dale Van Atta

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of Bill Marriott: Success is Never Final by Dale Van Atta

I have a love/hate relationship with biographies of successful people. This book talks about what Bill Marriott was doing when he was my age, how much money he’d earned, and the success he’d achieved, and it makes me feel a little underwhelmed about my own achievements. I know it’s not fair or productive, so I don’t dwell on it, but…wow.  Maybe I need to up my game? Get into the hotel business? Nah, I guess raising a family and teaching sixth graders has its own importance, and it’s what I love. So I’ll stick with it for now. It does go to show you what you can accomplish if you work hard, and that’s a take-away we can all learn from. I hope you enjoy my book review of Bill Marriott: Success is Never Final by Dale Van Atta.

Blurb:

“Bill Marriott—son of J. Willard Marriott, who opened a root-beer stand that grew into the Hot Shoppes Restaurant chain and evolved into the Marriott hotel company—grew up in the family business. In his more than fifty years at the company’s helm, Bill Marriott was the driving force behind growing Marriott into the world’s largest global hotel chain.

Bill Marriott: Success is Never Final gives readers an intimate portrait of the life of this business titan and his definition of success. Bill shares details about his private struggles with his domineering father’s chronic harsh criticism; his innovations in the hotel industry; and the boundless passion and energy he demonstrated for his work, family, and faith. Bill also shares spiritual experiences that allowed him to recognize God’s guidance in his personal life.

  • Details the story from Bill Marriott’s first job in his family’s restaurants to his monumental decisions in building Marriott into the largest hotel chain in the world.
  • A boat explosion, just a week after his father died, caused a fire that severely burned Bill’s body and damaged his hands so significantly, it was unclear if he would be able to use his fingers.
  • Part of Bill’s management legacy includes substantial and widespread philanthropic work, educational programs, and community outreach.
  • As a business leader, Bill has met with American presidents, foreign dignitaries, and other business moguls. The biography is filled with newly told, behind-the-scenes, intimate stories such as ‘family dinners’ with the Eisenhowers and the Marriotts.
  • Readers will learn the fascinating details about the successes and failures of Bill’s business ventures and relate to his challenges of balancing roles as a CEO, a husband and father, and a man of faith.

This is the remarkable story of a man who had the vision to create a multibillion-dollar business, who understood the power of giving, and who lived the creed that hard work will pay off but success is never final.”

My Book Review:

I’ve stayed in Marriott hotels before, and I’ve seen them as we’ve traveled, but I didn’t know very much about its beginnings or the man who took it to the top. Now I know a lot about each of those things, and lots of other stuff as well! This book is VERY detailed. I’m not sure how anyone can remember so much from so long ago. I know that both Bill Marriott and his father, J. Willard, kept good journals, and I have to say that it paid off. There is so much information in this book! It even goes into detail about the Marriott ancestors that crossed the plains to end up in Utah.

Not only does it chronicle Bill’s life, but it goes in-depth into his father and mother’s upbringings as well. There is a lot about the relationship between Bill and his father. Unfortunately, most of it doesn’t sound very good. This book goes step-by-step into how the Marriott company began and evolved over the years. I had never heard of a Hot Shoppe restaurant before. Have you? They sound like quite an adventure! I found it interesting to learn about several things Bill tried that didn’t do very well. Did you know he owned a cruise ship? Or a few theme parks? Crazy, right?

Bill Marriot: Success is Never Final is well written. As I stated previously, it’s VERY detailed. There were a few things that I didn’t really care to know, but it was interesting to see how everything shaped Bill’s life in the way it did. I can tell that this book was very well researched. I thought the book flowed well; it was mostly easy to read and understand. There were a few technical paragraphs talking about stocks or financing that I didn’t know anything about. Unfortunately, I didn’t understand them as well.

 My favorite thing about this book was to see Bill’s drive, work ethic, and devotion to his family and faith. I’m not sure how he fit it all in! I’m sure he didn’t want some of his failures to be brought up, but it was also good to see that he is just a normal guy who makes mistakes and learns from them. His work ethic and charity are such a good example of what you need to do to succeed at something.

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13 (Although there is not a ton, there is some profanity in this book.)

Age Recommendation: 16+

My Rating: 3.5/5

3.5 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2ZVIKid

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand  The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown
 

Review of The Lady in the Coppergate Tower

The Lady in the Coppergate Tower by Nancy Campbell Allen

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Lady in the Coppergate Tower by Nancy Campbell Allen

You know me; I love a good fairy tell retelling. I love how authors are able to take a familiar story and rethink it, looking at it from different angles perspectives. Looking at the characters in a unique way, and trying to find a story within a story are also something I enjoy about retellings. When I saw that Nancy Campbell Allen had done a re-telling of Rapunzel I was super excited. Having it steampunk made it all the more fun! I love this little world she is creating surrounding Blackwell Manor and its residents and friends, so I couldn’t wait to read it. I hope you enjoy my review of The Lady in the Coppergate Tower by Nancy Campbell Allen.

Blurb:

“Hazel Hughes believes there is nothing remarkable about her, not even her strange ability to heal the sick and injured. Her employer, Doctor Sam MacInnes recognizes her special talent, but because of the difference in their social status, he can’t tell her how much he admires her. When a mysterious count arrives in London and reveals to Hazel the existence of a twin sister, she agrees to accompany him to the wilds of Romania, where she learns that her healing skills are needed to save her twin’s life. Worried for her safety, Sam insists on accompanying her.

Faced with dark magic, malfunctioning automatons, and dangerous magical artifacts, Hazel and Sam learn to rely on each other as they untangle a dangerous and dark web of mystery surrounding the mysterious count, and search for a way to free Hazel’s sister from the cursed walls of a Coppergate Tower before time runs out on all of them.”

My Book Review:

I seriously love this little steampunk Victorian society that Nancy Campbell Allen has created. It’s so fun and imaginative! I love that you can take such a prim and proper time period and add robots (automatons), transcribers (pagers), submarines, and so much more! It’s also fun to see characters from past books make appearances; it kind of brings it all together.

I liked the cover art of the book before I started reading it, but once I had gotten to know the characters inside the book, the characters on the cover didn’t work for me. I know it’s picky, but I didn’t think they looked anything like the characters in my head. Haha! It’s not that big of a deal, though.

The story line is unique and fun. I thought the fancy, important count coming to get Hazel was a bit creepy, and don’t think I would have gone with him if it’d been me. Hazel’s intentions to save her sister were genuine, though, and that would be a compelling reason to go with him. I thought a few parts were a bit predictable, but a lot of it surprised me. It had enough twists and turns to keep me reading. I had to know more about the sister! What was happening to her? What could Hazel do to save her?

Nancy Campbell Allen does a great job of describing and developing characters. Each character has his or her own characteristics, voice, and personality. I especially liked Sam and Hazel. They have differing viewpoints of the situation at hand, and each of them handles it in a unique way. I liked seeing their strengths and weaknesses throughout the book. As the book progresses, you get to see growth and development in both Hazel and Sam. I enjoyed watching them evolve and change.

Another thing Nancy Campbell Allen does well is describe this world she has created. I love the descriptions of all the high-techie Victorian era stuff! Because it predates our current technology, things are named differently (I gave some examples above), and I enjoy her depictions of them. I enjoy reading her writing because it’s easy to read and understand, it’s entertaining, and it all flows well. It’s clever, too, which makes it more fun to read.

I enjoyed The Lady in the Coppergate Tower. I liked the beginning and middle a lot more than I liked the ending, though. I didn’t like the ending. Most of the story leads up to the ending, and It felt like it took a long time to get there. Then, once I got there, the ending felt a bit rushed to me. It also felt a little too unrealistic, and I still had some questions that didn’t get answered. The other thing I didn’t love about the ending was that it felt a little too much like a copy-cat of something else. I don’t want to spoil anything so I won’t go into more detail than that, but I felt like I’d already seen the ending. Overall, though, it was a fun book. I liked it.

Blog Tour The Lady in the Coppergate Tower

Content Rating PG-13+Content Rating: PG-13 (There isn’t any profanity or “intimacy” in this book, except for kissing. There is some violence, though. A couple characters are attacked, and another character is abused. A couple characters die.)

Age Recommendation: YA+

My Rating: 3.5/5

3.5 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/334zivR 

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Beauty and Clockwork Beast by Nancy Campbell Allen Kiss of the Spindle by Nancy Campbell Allen my fair gentleman
 
 
Featured Image Credit: Goodreads.com
 

The Orphan’s Song by Lauren Kate

The Orphan's Song by Lauren Kate

♦This post contains affiliate links. You don’t pay any extra, and I make a small commission.♦

♦Please see my Disclosure tab for more information.♦

Book Review of The Orphan's Song by Lauren Kate

I’ve never been to Venice, but now that I’ve read this book, I seriously need to go. While I was reading, coincidentally, my friend was in Venice. She posted a lot of pictures from her amazing trip, and I definitely felt a little social media jealousy. What a beautiful city! I can only imagine what it had been like in the 1700s. We probably romanticize it more than it was, but since we weren’t there, why not? I did not know anything about the Ospedale degli Incurabili—a hospital and orphanage for children, and so it was fun to delve into that world. I find it so interesting that they taught the children there to love, appreciate, and excel at music, and it also provided funding for the hospital and orphanage. The Orphan’s Song by Lauren Kate is a masterfully written story, and I loved it!

Blurb:

“As befitting a book set in eighteenth century Venice, Italy, the novel spins a riveting tale of secrets kept and secrets revealed and the far-reaching consequences of both. Based on a gripping chapter in Venice’s remarkable history, The Orphan’s Song brilliantly recreates both the glamour and seedy underbelly of a city at its zenith.

Known as ‘the city of masks,’ Venice, circa 1736, is notorious for its excesses and its reputation as the place where lovers and revelers don Carnevale disguises to move secretly within society. On most days the city’s sick and orphans are the only bare faces wandering the city. Yearning to join the masked revelers are two foundlings raised within the walls of the Hospital of the Incurables, a famous house of worship that serves as both hospital and orphanage. Over centuries, its massive stone complex (still standing today) has been reinvented as a conservatory for the best singers and musicians on the continent, an ingenious plan that brings acclaim to the church and its coffers.

Among the talented foundlings are Violetta and Mino, lonely teens with big dreams who meet for the first time on an off-limits rooftop. Violinist Mino is a self-taught luthier with aspirations that reach far beyond his humble beginnings. Violetta, a gifted soprano who, despite her desire to rise to soloist in the church’s renowned choir, yearns to break free of the Incurables’ walls and embrace the unknown on the outside. Their tentative private duet—first musical, then romantic—is strictly forbidden, and the risks they take launch them on separate journeys that radically transform their lives.

Mino is determined to find the mother who abandoned him as a toddler, while Violetta steadfastly avoids entanglements and motherhood in her quest for stardom as a legendary soprano with a secret nighttime life. But both will find themselves tossed by society’s cruel unpredictability as they navigate the world and its endless seductions. Despite their separations and painful discoveries, they’ll discover that fate has more in store for them than they could ever have imagined for themselves. With its stunning plot twists and sophisticated sense of history, The Orphan’s Song blends the author’s signature fast-paced storytelling with an enchanting love story for the ages.”  

My Book Review:

I loved this book! Wow. Just wow. The characters, descriptions, feelings, and emotions transform this book into an intimate view of a very personal story. You become a part of Mino and Violetta’s story. You’re there to witness the highs, lows, and everything in between. You laugh and cry with them. You feel their love and their hate. In return, their story becomes a part of yours.

The Orphan’s Song is very well written. The writing sucks you in from the very beginning. I loved the descriptions of the Venetians with their masks, beautiful clothing, and fancy parties. It’s not hard to see why Mino and Violetta wished for more. From their rooftop they could see so much, and they couldn’t have any of it. As the reader, you feel their loss and their want. The way Kate writes the scene of the mother abandoning her child makes it so real and raw and personal.

Violetta, Mino, and the many other characters just come to life on the page. It may be a platitude, but it is so true, in this book. Seriously. Each character is well developed, realistic, unique, and has his or her own personality. The characters switch off narrating the chapters, and I never had to think about who was talking.

One of my favorite things about this book are the feelings portrayed. The writing is so superb that you feel the emotions of the story. I also loved the complexity of the plot and the characters. I was definitely surprised by some of the events and some of the decisions the characters made. The story flowed well, and I loved it. I could not put this book down.  

Content Rating RContent Rating: R (Profanity, including at least one “f” word. “Intimacy,” including scenes and innuendos. Violence including murder and domestic violence.)

Recommendation: Adult

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2Jnt8zi

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In: