The Five Legends by the ANASAZI Foundation

The Five Legends by the ANASAZI Foundation

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Book Review of The Five Legends by the ANASAZI Foundation

When the publicist asked if I would review this book I said, “Yes!” because it has a good title. I don’t usually read the blurbs about books, so when I picked it up I totally thought it was going to be MG or YA fantasy. Hahaha! Ummmm…no. This book is not fantasy at all. It’s fiction, but it’s an allegory written about two brothers whose hearts have turned against each other. These brothers happen to be people that lived long ago. The Anasazi. It’s not very long, but it packs a big punch! There’s a lot of wisdom and knowledge squeezed into a few pages. There are many lessons to be gleaned from this story. Find out more in my book review of The Five Legends by the ANASAZI Foundation.

Blurb:

“Drawing on thirty years of helping families in crisis, this profound fable by the ANASAZI Foundation illustrates the anguish of conflict and shows how we can end war within ourselves, within families, and even between nations.

The Five Legends is the story of two estranged brothers, leaders of their people, who find themselves on an unexpected journey marked by struggle as they fall into a formidable canyon. Trapped and injured, the two brothers are rescued by an old man—‘the last of a people’—who agrees to guide them out of the canyon, but only if they agree to listen to the Five Legends of peace. The brothers learn that to heal any conflict we must first look within ourselves. At its core, ‘War does not begin or end with armies and leaders. In truth, war begins and ends within each of us—within our hearts.”

My Book Review:

When I agreed to review this book I had never heard of the ANASAZI Foundation. It sounds like an amazing program. The ANASAZI Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c)(3)that is based in Arizona. It’s a “wilderness therapy program for young adults and youth at risk [and has been] recognized internationally for its caring and nonpunitive approach to helping youth overcome challenges and see their seeds of greatness.” This program “gives young people an opportunity, through a primitive living experience and a philosophy that invites healing at the hands of nature, to effect a change of heart—a change in one’s whole way of walking the world…[It gives youth] a place free from distractions, where one can learn, ponder, and build” If you’d like to learn more about the ANASAZI Foundation, you may find more information at: www.anasazi.org.

Now onto the story. Picture two teenage or early-twenties young men. Brothers. They are the sons of their people’s leader, and they do not get along. They argue and disagree with each other. When their father passes away the disagreements come to a head and the two brothers go different ways. Each leads his people, and each blames his brother for the rift, heartache, and all his problems. Many years pass, and with each passing year their hatred of each other increases. Then something happens that brings them together for the first time in many years. An accident follows, and they embark on a journey to mend their divided hearts.

This book is very well written. It flows well, is easy to read and understand, and I really like the writing style. Somehow it makes you feel calm and peaceful even when it’s discussing war and fighting. I loved reading about the Five Legends of peace. This book is broken up into different sections, and I didn’t find it off-putting or difficult to read. The character development is very well done. You feel like you are feeling the emotions of the characters.

My favorite thing about this allegory is all the lessons that it packs into its slim 96 pages. Wow! You’ve got forgiveness and repentance. You have looking inside yourself first before placing the blame on someone else. There’s also the importance of family and living a life of WE. I love that one! We can’t do much by ourselves, but when WE work together, we can do amazing things. You also have the importance of seeing each other as people. Real people—with feelings, dreams, hopes, strengths and weaknesses—people who are doing their best. We need to look at the positives and the good in people before we focus on everything that is wrong.

I think the journey the brothers take is significant also. Being together and doing things together on this journey through life is what bonds us together. Also, life is a journey. Sometimes bad things happen, and sometimes good things happen along the way. There may be times where we get lost or lose our possessions. There may be times along the way where we feel like we can’t go on or we lose hope. What’s important is the connections in our lives—our connections to other people. It’s living a life of WE instead of me. It’s the importance of looking outside ourselves and seeing other people. Really seeing them.

I liked this book a lot. I loved watching the characters grow and develop along the way, and I loved all the symbolism and lessons. This book teaches some very important lessons that are needed in today’s world. I highly recommend this book. I think it would make a great family or school read-aloud too!

Content Rating PGContent Rating: PG (There isn’t any profanity or “intimacy” in this book. There isn’t any violence either.)

Age Recommendation: YA (13-18) and Adult (Younger children could read it, but they will not grasp the symbolism or lessons taught.)

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

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Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

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Review of Atomic Habits by James Clear

Atomic Habits by James Clear

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Book Review of Atomic Habits by James Clear

I swear, everywhere I turned, James Clear was there talking about his book. I heard him on several podcasts, heard other people talking about it, and then I kept seeing his book everywhere. Well, it worked. All that promotion definitely caught my attention. I reserved Atomic Habits at the library and then waited. After a brief wait, I checked the book out and brought it home. I was super excited to read it. Then life happened—school, kids, house, other books—and I kind of forgot I had the book. That was, until I got an email saying it was due back to the library. Oops! I hadn’t even started it yet. Guess what I did? I started the book. Yep, I didn’t take it back. That was a couple of weeks ago, and I just finished the book. Ummm…yeah, I’m going to have quite the fine, but I had to finish! If you haven’t heard anything about this book, check out my book review of Atomic Habits by James Clear.

Blurb:

“No matter your goals, Atomic Habits offers a proven framework for getting 1% better every day. James Clear, one of the world’s leading experts on habit formation, reveals practical strategies that will teach you exactly how to master the tiny behaviors that lead to remarkable results.

If you’re having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn’t you. The problem is your system. Bad habits repeat themselves not because you don’t want to change but because you have the wrong system for change. You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems. In Atomic Habits, you’ll get a plan that can take you to new heights.

Clear is known for his ability to distill complex topics into simple behaviors that can be readily applied to daily life and work. Here, he draws on ideas from biology, psychology, and neuroscience to create an easy-to-understand guide for making good habits inevitable and bad habits impossible. Along the way, readers will be inspired and entertained with true stories from Olympic god medalists, award-winning artists, business leaders, life-saving physicians, and star comedians who have used the science of small habits to vault to the top of their fields.

Atomic Habits will reshape the way you think about progress and give you the tools and techniques you need to transform your habits—whether you are an athlete looking to win a championship, a leader hoping to optimize an organization, or an individual who wishes to quit smoking, lose weight, reduce stress, and achieve success that lasts.”

My Book Review:

I know you’re asking…was it worth the big fine at the library? In a word, yes! I have never thought about habits in this way. It is clearly a new way of thinking, and it takes a bit of a shift in perspective. However, once that shift is made, I think it will be difficult to go back to the old way of thinking. Clear makes it seem so easy!

This book is very well written. His writing is clear and to the point. His writing style is easy to read and understand. The book has a great progression from small to big-picture, and each chapter is well thought-out and full of ideas. I like the chapter summaries at the end of each chapter that give the reader quick bullet points to remember what was taught. There are also diagrams throughout each chapter that do a great job of illustrating his points.

I love the examples that Clear uses to show and explain his thoughts and ideas. He uses Olympic athletes, professional sports coaches, and important business people’s routines and processes to show how it all works, and it makes it seem so simple! He’s not naïve, though. Clear knows that it’s harder than it seems, so he does a good job explaining how easy it is to fall off the habit-train. What’s great is that he gives you ideas on how to make it easier to start, follow, and continue habits.

I feel so ready to start some habits! I’m pumped, and I’m also ready for the long-haul. This truly is a remarkable book. It’s filled with a new way of thinking about habits, and a simple shift in perspective that will allow people of all shapes, sizes, backgrounds, and abilities to improve their lives. This book aims to make people the best they can be, and I’m excited to get started!

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (There’s no profanity, “intimacy,” or violence in this book.)

Age Recommendation: YA (13-18+) and Adult

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2TcCtLO

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

the seven habits of highly effective families by stephen r covey The Compliment Quotient by Monica Strobel does change have to be so hard
 
 

Waiting For Fitz by Spencer Hyde

Waiting For Fitz by Spencer Hyde

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Book Review of Waiting For Fitz by Spencer Hyde

Mental health is a difficult topic to discuss. It’s rough sometimes. It is also a topic that is very close to my heart. I have a child who suffers from debilitating anxiety, panic attacks, and depression. This child missed months of school and was so sick that he had to be hospitalized. Twice. We thought he may need to be put in a mental ward, but, thankfully, he never had to. That was almost two years ago, and although it’s gotten a lot better, anxiety is something he deals with daily. We’re still living minute to minute with him. The more people I tell his story to, the more people tell me that their child deals with something similar. We need to talk about this. We need to bring this issue to the forefront because it is way more common than we think it is. Let’s end the stigma. Fiction is a great way to start this process, and I applaud Spencer for tackling this tough issue. Learn more about his book in my book review of Waiting For Fitz by Spencer Hyde.

Blurb:

“Addie loves nothing more than curling up on the couch with her dog, Duck, and watching The Great British Baking Show with her mom. It’s one of the few things that can help her relax when her OCD kicks into overdrive. She counts everything. All the time. She can’t stop. Rituals and rhythms. It’s exhausting.

When Fitz was diagnosed with schizophrenia, he named the voices in his head after famous country singers. The adolescent psychiatric ward at Seattle Regional Hospital isn’t exactly the ideal place to meet your soul mate, but when Addie meets Fitz, they immediately connect over their shared love of words, appreciate each other’s quick wit, and wish they could both make more sense of their lives.

Fitz is haunted by the voices in his head and often doesn’t know what is real. But he feels if he can convince Addie to help him escape the psych ward and get to San Jan Island, everything will be okay. If not, he risks falling into a downward spiral that may keep him in the hospital indefinitely.

Waiting For Fitz is a story about life and love, forgiveness and courage, and learning what is truly worth waiting for.”

My Book Review:

I loved this book! The wit, humor, and word play Spencer Hyde uses make the book, for sure. Let’s talk about the wittiness of this book. It’s clever, well-timed and well-placed, and it makes for some great banter between Addie and Fitz. Fitz’ shirts are great, and I love that Addie and Fitz are about equal in their wittiness so they have some fun conversations. The humor goes along with the wit. I am a word lover, so I love the words and language in this book. Both Fitz and Addie are very intelligent, and I love how they use words in their conversations. Oftentimes we think of wit and word play as strategies to convey humor or happiness. It’s light and airy, right? Well, somehow Spencer Hyde is able to use both wit and humor during difficult and hard conversations as well. He is quite a gifted writer.

I’ve talked a bit about Addie and Fitz. They are definitely the main characters in the book, and they are great characters. Each of them is well thought-out, well developed, and unique. Even though they both like to be witty, they do it in a way that matches their own personality. I loved learning about each character’s history, strengths, weaknesses, and struggles. OCD and schizophrenia are very different diagnoses, and even though I don’t have either one of them, I thought they were portrayed well.

The other patients in the ward are also developed well. Leah, Wolf, Didi, and Junior each have their own reasons for being in the mental ward, and you really feel for each of them. Yes, there is humor around them and some of their conditions, but at the same time, you know how much they struggle. You know they don’t want to be there. You want them to get help and hopefully be able to graduate out of the ward. The use of humor around some of their difficulties makes you laugh, but it also serves as a way to highlight that condition and how hard it must be to live with that mental illness.

This story pulls at your heartstrings. As the reader you want to be able to jump in and help those kids. You want them to feel loved and to be able to find a way to cope with their conditions so they can return to the outside world. I’m so thankful to the people that work in mental health. There are not enough of them. When my son was struggling the most, I called pretty much every psychologist within a 50 mile radius of my house. The shortest wait I could find was three months. Yep, all of them were either booked out three months, didn’t see children, or didn’t take our insurance. We need more good, smart, and kind people to work in mental health.

I loved this quote by the author:

Addie’s OCD is a reflection of my experience translated through a fictional character…In Waiting For Fitz, I have taken my personal experiences and fictionalized them. I have created this made-up world and tried to fill it with real-world significance, and meaning, with truth. I believe that is the aim of all fiction: we strive to put words into a rhythm and order that will reveal something redemptive about what it means to be human. It is a lesson in empathy; it is practice in how to live.

I agree completely. What a great way to discuss complex topics. Fiction allows you to see a more complete picture of the characters’ lives, of their personalities, wants, dreams, strengths, weaknesses, and trials. Fiction allows you to see a different side of the story, and to feel many of the characters’ emotions. Just as Wonder highlights physical attributes, Waiting For Fitz highlights mental illness and the need for more compassion, empathy, knowledge, and acceptance.

fitz blog tour 1

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13 (There isn’t any profanity or “intimacy” in this book; there is one scene that is a bit violent. However, this book is full of themes that are inappropriate for MG or younger readers. )

Age Recommendation: YA (13-18) and Adult

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2Fbif1j

 

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mustaches for maddie Squint by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown A Monster Like Me by Wendy S. Swore
 
 
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Seven at Sea by Erik and Emily Orton

Seven at Sea by Erik and Emily Orton

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Book Review of Seven at Sea by Erik and Emily Orton

Wow! What an adventure! I grew up boating—on lakes. I love it so much. I’m a pretty good slalom skier, and I love the feel of the wind as you cruise on top of the water. However, when the weather turns nasty, I want to be as far away from the water as possible. The big waves scare me. A lot. It scares me so much that I won’t even go on the cruise my husband wants to go on. You know, the one on the really big, fancy boat. There is absolutely no way you’d get me in a 38 ft. catamaran that I’d have to sail. Through the Caribbean. With my four kids. And the Ortons have five kids. They are brave and adventurous! I admire their sense of family, and am kind of jealous of some of the lessons they learned together, but I think I’d rather learn some of those lessons on land. Learn more about their book, and their adventure, in my book review of Seven at Sea by Erik and Emily Orton.

Blurb:

“Working the night shift as a temp in a high-rise cubicle, Erik Orton knew something had to change. He felt the responsibility of providing for his wife and their five children—the youngest with Down syndrome—but craved a life that offered more than just surviving.

Watching the sailboats on the Hudson River during his sunset dinner breaks, Erik dared to dream. What would it be like to leave the hustle of the city and instead spend a year on a sailboat, somewhere beautiful, as a family? Despite having no sailing experience, his wife Emily’s phobia of deep water, and already stretching every dollar to pay rent and buy groceries, the family of seven turned their excuses into reasons and their fears into motivation. Sure, they would miss their friends, they could go broke, they could get injured or die. Worst of all, they could humiliate themselves by trying something audacious and failing. But the little time they still had together as a family, before their oldest daughter left for college, was drifting away. The Ortons cast off the life they knew to begin an uncertain journey of 5,000 miles between New York City and the Caribbean, ultimately arriving at a new place within themselves.

A portrait of a captivating and resilient family and a celebration of the courage it takes to head for something over the horizon, this is a deeply compelling story—told alternately by Erik and Emily—for all those who dream of leaving routine in their wake.”

My Book Review:

I just have to say that they are way braver than I am! There is no way my husband could ever talk me into doing something like this. I’m way too scared of the ocean. I don’t mind playing in the waves if the water is warm, but I’m scared of going on a cruise on a big, fancy boat. Yeah, no way. However, I do greatly admire them. I have a 17 year-old who will be a senior next year, and I would love to do something like this, but on land. I’d love to have my family all to myself for just a little while.

This book is well written. I liked the writing styles of both Erik and Emily. Sometimes I had to look back to see which one of them had written that chapter, but it was usually obvious by their writing. As a woman, I thought it was interesting to read Erik’s point of view. It’s not often we women get to delve into a man’s brain like that. I definitely related more to Emily, but it’s always great to hear the other point of view. Each of their chapters were well thought-out and full of emotion.

I found it interesting that you could feel the tension between them in some of the chapters. It wasn’t always easy. They made sure the reader knew that it was a hard journey. Living in a little boat like that with seven people for that long would be very difficult, and I appreciated their honesty. I know how frustrated I get sometimes when we’re camping for a week. Haha! Living on a boat would be so hard. I think they all had to learn how to read each other and give space, if needed. They also had to learn how to individually handle their personal struggles so they didn’t turn into a complete meltdown.

I loved learning about their journey! The strength and growth of the children was amazing to see. What an amazing memory and story they’ll always have to tell. I’d love to read about this journey from their perspectives as well. Some of the lessons they learned will be invaluable in their lives.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Although I’d never want to do it on the ocean, I may need to make time for a similar land journey. Maybe travel across the country, or something. I highly recommend this book. It’s fun to read about people reaching and fulfilling their dreams. It allows you, as the reader, to dream and plan too.  

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13 (There isn’t any violence in this book, and there are only one or two swear words. However, there are two occasions where they mention that they, “Make love.” There aren’t any details or descriptions–that’s all it says.)

Age Recommendation: Young Adult (14+) and Adult

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2Ux1D9p

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

  The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown
 
 
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Book Review of Healing Hearts by Sarah M. Eden

Healing Hearts by Sarah M Eden

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Book Review of Healing Hearts by Sarah M. Eden

What a fun surprise to be able to return to Savage Wells! I liked The Sheriffs of Savage Wells even though it was a bit corny. When I heard about Healing Hearts by Sarah M. Eden, a sister book about another character from Savage Wells, I had to get my hands on it. Lucky for me it turned out be about one of my favorite characters. The doctor, Gideon MacNamara, is a favorite in the town and of readers. I liked his character a lot in the first book, so I was excited to read more about him in this book. Even though I lost a little respect for him when I found out he sent for a mail-order bride, he may have done enough after that to gain back some of that respect.

Blurb:

“As the only doctor in the frontier town of Savage Wells, Gideon MacNamara knows his prospects for a bride are limited. The womenfolk in town are either too young, too old, or already spoken for. So, being a practical man, he decides to take advantage of the matchmaking service of the day—mail-order brides—and sends away for a woman with nursing experience.

When Miriam steps off the stagecoach in Savage Wells, she sees a bright future in front of her. But when the town—and Gideon—meets her, ready for a wedding, her excitement quickly turns to horror. Somehow Dr. MacNamara’s message had gotten turned around. He didn’t want just a nurse, he wanted a wife. When she refuses to marry him, she finds herself stranded in Savage Wells with some very unhappy townspeople.

But Gideon is not like the other men Miriam has met. Embarrassed by the misunderstanding, he offers her a job, and the two begin an awkward—and often humorous—dance of getting to know each other as they work to care for the people of their town. Romance blossoms between the two, but when a former medical associate of Miriam’s arrives in town, Gideon and the other townsfolk must rally around Miriam to protect her from a dangerous fate. Gideon and Miriam must decide if they are willing to risk their hearts for each other even as buried secrets are brought to light.”

My Book Review:

Well, the first thing that comes to mind after reading this book is how thankful I am to live right now—in February of 2019. I’m thankful that “the matchmaking service of the day” is no longer mail-order brides! It might be an internet dating site or a crazy aunt Esmerelda, but thankfully it isn’t mail-order any more. I’m also thankful for vaccinations, medical knowledge, hospitals, and women’s rights. I know that it may not be perfect, but we live in an amazing time, and we’ve come a LONG way!

Healing Hearts is written well. I personally think it’s much better written than The Sheriffs of Savage Wells is. It still has a few cheesy parts, but really, what is a romance without those morsels? The writing style of the book just draws you in. From the very first page you just feel connected to the story. It’s descriptive without feeling overdramatic, and simple enough to match the feeling of the time. Don’t get me wrong, although seemingly simple, the story is complex, with several plot lines converging from many places.

You have Miriam’s past and present, Gideon’s past and present, along with the townspeople. As the reader, you have the opportunity to meet many of the townsfolk. As you meet them and learn of their stories, it helps you better understand their feelings, motivations, and loyalties. The townspeople and the main characters are well written and well developed. There are a few familiar faces along with a few new faces as well. Some of the new faces aren’t too friendly, but a few of them may surprise you. Miriam and Gideon are so well developed.

Miriam is a bit guarded about her past, and it’s understandable when you learn more about her. Gideon takes her guardedness the wrong way and almost ends up destroying their chances all together. Of course we get to see Paisley, Cade, and Hawk again, and that’s fun. I love how they all play off of each other. Their friendship and loyalty are part of what makes them such great characters.

At first glance, the story may seem superficial. Man sends for mail-order bride. Bride didn’t get the bride memo and runs away. However, when you get into the story, it’s quite complex and has a heavier feel to it than the previous book. The topics and themes are very weighted and serious. There are some severe and deathly diseases discussed, along with serious mental health issues, which were not dealt with properly in the 1800s. Women’s rights are also right there at the top in this book. I wish it were just women’s pay, or something easier to discuss, but it’s truly about a woman’s right to be herself. To take care of herself.To represent herself.To prove herself.To be a human.

Although I liked the ending and thought it came together well, there were a few situations that worked out a little too perfectly. As a reader, I’m glad they did, but it may not be quite as realistic as what would have really happened. It’s also a little predictable. Overall, though, I loved the book. Since I’ve started teaching I don’t have as much time to read as I’d like to, but even with little time, I made time for this book. I finished it in two days because I couldn’t put it down. Now, my dishes and children may have felt a bit ignored, but they’ll live.  If you like proper romances, sweet love stories, or medical dramas, you’ll enjoy this book.

healing hearts blog tour image

Content Rating PG-13Content Rating: PG-13 (There’s no profanity or “intimacy” this book (except for some kissing). You don’t read any physical violence scenes, but there is some physical abuse described, and it’s not pretty. There is also some emotional abuse and a severe sickness that sickens many characters. The themes and topics discussed are quite heavy.)

Age Recommendation: 14+ (Some of the topics discussed may be too much for 14 year-olds. Parents will be the best judge of what their children can handle.)

 

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click the photo below:

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

The Sheriffs of Savage Wells by Sarah M. Eden Longing for Home by Sarah M. Eden  Ashes on the Moor by Sarah M. Eden
 
 
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Lies, Love, and Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Julie Wright

Lies, Love, and Breakfast at Tiffany's by Julie Wright

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Book Review of Lies, Love, and Breakfast at Tiffany's by Julie Wright

I loved Julie Wright’s previous book Lies Jane Austen Told Me, so I was pretty excited to read this book. The only problem was that I am a huge Jane Austen fan, so the previous book fit me perfectly. I truly (gasp!) don’t know anything about Audrey Hepburn. I have not seen any of her movies, so going into it I hoped I could feel a connection with this book anyway. I needn’t have worried–Ms. Wright has a fun writing style that draws you into the story and makes you feel right at home. The only problem now? Now I really want to watch an Audrey Hepburn movie so I know what everyone is talking about! Anyone want to do an Audrey Hepburn marathon with me?

Blurb:

The Lie

Women in Hollywood are just pretty faces. But Silvia Bradshaw knows that’s a lie, and she’s ready to be treated as an equal and prove her worth as one of Hollywood’s newest film editors.

The Love

She and Ben Mason had worked together as editors before Silvia got her big break, so he’s the perfect person to ask for feedback on her first major film. But even as their friendship begins to blossom into something more, a lawsuit surfaces, jeopardizing both Ben and Silvia’s jobs—as well as their fledgling romance. Audrey Hepburn one said: ‘The most important thing is to enjoy your life—to be happy—it’s all that matters.’ Silvia agrees. Or she used to. It’s one thing to risk her job and her heart, but can she really risk Ben’s too? Does she have the right to make decisions for her own happiness when they affect so many other people?

The Breakfast

With everything to lose, Silvia meets Ben for breakfast at his favorite diner, Tiffany’s, for one last conversation before the credits roll on true love.”

My Book Review:

First off, I love the cover of this book! I love the classic red dress with the gloves and hat—so fun! It’s very Audrey Hepburn-ish. I think. Haha! I had to Google “Audrey Hepburn” because I had no idea. Here’s a pic from IMDB.com:

Audrey Hepburn (IMDB.com)

She is beautiful! Here are a few of the movies she’s known for, and that are mentioned in the book:

   


Silvia is a film editor at a major production company. It turns out that it’s quite the accomplishment for a woman because there aren’t many women film editors out there. She routinely recognizes that she is the only woman in the room. Many of those good ol’ boys still have an antiquated view of women, and it isn’t a good one. They aren’t very accepting of women in their space. She holds her own, though! She works hard and does a very good job. In fact, she does such a good job that she may even be recognized for her work.

Then, one fateful night, a drunk boss and a looming deadline collide. What is she going to do? How will she get the finishing touches on the film ready for the next day’s meeting? I’m not telling. Nope, you’ll need to read it. I don’t want to give anything away. Just suffice it to say that what happens next changes the course of her life. No biggie.

Silvia is such a fun character. She is relatable, personable, real, and likable. She’s a strong female character, which I love. Silvia is not perfect, by any means, and that’s one of the things that makes her such a great character. She can be a little clueless when it comes to recognizing how others feel about her, but she eventually catches on. I love her voice in the book. I don’t know anything about editing movies, but all of that seemed legitimate to me. It was fun watching her growth over the course of the book.

I loved many of the other characters as well. Silvia’s grandma is a darling lady, and I loved her spunkiness. I liked Emma’s character because she reminds me of my bestie. She’d do anything for Silvia, but she also tells her like it is. Walt seems like a genuine gentleman, and I thought it was great when he came into the picture. Ben is well developed, and seems like such a great guy—for most of the book. There were a few times that I wanted to scream at him, but he’s a guy. They’re a little clueless sometimes.

When I had about 45 pages left, I seriously doubted that everything could be figured out by the end of the book. “Ahhhhh!!!! What.Just.Happened? No. What?” Those were just a few of my thoughts. Yep, there’s quite the revelation, and it threw me for a loop, for sure! I didn’t want to believe it, but there it was. Keep reading. That’s my advice. I won’t say anything more…don’t throw the book out the window. Keep reading.

There were a couple of things I noticed that were missed by the editors–they didn’t quite fit, but I have an ARE (Advanced Reader’s Edition), so they should hopefully be fixed in the for sale copy. 

I liked this book a lot! I stayed up too late last night finishing it, but I couldn’t put it down. The characters are well done, relatable, and realistic, and the writing style just draws you in. It’s a fast, entertaining, weekend read. Even though I don’t know anything about Audrey Hepburn, I still enjoyed it.

Lies-and-Love-Blog-Tour

Content Rating PG+Rating: PG+ (There isn’t any profanity or violence. There’s not any “intimacy” except for some kissing. There is scene with a drunk boss.)

Recommendation: YA and up

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2Tt6WXf

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Lies Jane Austen Told Me by Julie Wright  Ashes on the Moor by Sarah M. Eden  Forever and Forever by Josi S. Kilpack
 

 

Book Review of Christmas by Accident by Camron Wright

Christmas by Accident by Camron Wright

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Book Review of Christmas by Accident by Camron Wright

I’m not going to hear the end of this one for awhile! I am a very strict, “No Christmas until after Thanksgiving!” kind of gal. My kids want to listen to Christmas music right now, in October, and I say no. So, when they find out that I just read and am now reviewing a Christmas book, well, yeah, they’re never going to let it go. I know they’re going to think it’s okay to put up the Christmas decorations and start going Christmas-crazy. Ummmm…..yeah no. This is a fun little book, though. It’s not all about Christmas—there’s a love story in there too! Want to know more? Read all about it in my book review of Christmas by Accident by Camron Wright.

Blurb:

“There are no accidents where love—and Christmas—are concerned. Carter is an insurance adjuster whose longing for creative expression spills over sometimes into his accident reports. Abby works for her adoptive father, Uncle Mannie, in the family bookstore, the ReadMore Café. Carter barely tolerates Christmas; Abby loves it. She can’t wait past October to build her favorite display, the annual Christmas book tree stack, which Carter despises.

When an automobile accident throws Carter and Abby together, Uncle Mannie, who is harboring secrets of his own, sees a chance for lasting happiness for his little girl. But there are so many hurdles, and not much time left. Will this Christmas deliver the miracles everyone is hoping for?

Camron Wright holds a master’s degree in writing and public relations. He says he began writing to get out of attending MBA school, and it proved the better decision. He is the author of the award-winning novels Letters for Emily (a Doubleday Book Club selection), The Rent Collector, and The Orphan Keeper.”

My Book Review:

Besides the fact that this is a Christmas book, and it’s October, it’s a cute story. I like the writing style because it’s easy to read. It’s hard to describe, but I would say that it’s laid-back and easy-going. Although there are a few intense moments, you never feel rushed through the story. I like it. He describes things well, and even while you’re reading about a car accident as it’s happening, you kind of feel like it’s happening in slow motion. It’s as if he takes the time to notice details that one would never recognize in such an intense moment, and it slows everything down for the reader.  

I like the characters in the story. They’re all likable and easy to relate to. I think they’re well developed and realistic. Abby is my favorite. If I weren’t a teacher, I think I’d be a librarian or work in a book store. Abby gets to work in a book store (I wish it were real because I’d love to try out their treats!) and loves to read, which makes her my new best friend. She doesn’t seem to engage in girl-drama, which is good. She has her priorities straight. I love the relationship she has with Mannie.

Carter kind of floats through his life. He doesn’t seem to have any motivation or ambition. He’s not happy, but not upset enough to change either. I do think it’s hilarious that Carter embellishes his accident reports and makes them sound like intense novel story lines. It’s fun to watch him grow throughout the story.

This is a fun book. It’s not too Christmassy; it could be read any time of the year, but it would be fun to read at Christmas. It’s a little cheesy in some parts, but not too bad. It’s an easy, fun, entertaining read. I liked the little lesson nuggets thrown in throughout the book: honesty, family, love, forgiveness, being brave and going for it, prayer, and miracles. It does have a touch of faith and prayer in it, but it’s not the main focus.    

Content Rating PG+Content Rating: PG+ (There isn’t any profanity or violence, except a couple of car accidents, and the descriptions aren’t overly graphic. There isn’t any “intimacy” except a couple of brief kisses.)

Recommendation: Young Adult and up

My Rating: 3.5/5

3.5 Star Rating

Christmas By Accident Blog Tour

 

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2CHyHFx

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

The Rent Collector by Camron Wright The Other Side of the Bridge by Camron Wright  The Evolution of Thomas Hall by Kieth Merrill
 
 

 

Book Review of The Storyteller’s Secret by Sejal Badani

The Storyteller's Secret by Sejal Badani

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Book Review of The Storyteller's Secret by Sejal Badani

I do not know much about India or Indian culture, even though I have a sister-in-law that is Indian. I should know more, but I don’t, unfortunately. When I was asked to read this book I got excited because I thought it would be fun to read more about it. There is a modern-day story set against a story from the past, and how they come together may determine the future. I hope you enjoy my book review of The Storyteller’s Secret by Sejal Badani.

Blurb:

“Nothing prepares Jaya, a New York journalist, for the heartbreak of her third miscarriage and the slow unraveling of her marriage in its wake. Desperate to assuage her deep anguish, she decides to go to India to uncover answers to her family’s past.

Intoxicated by the sights, smells, and sounds she experiences, Jaya becomes an eager student of the culture. But it is Ravi—her grandmother’s former servant and trusted confidant—who reveals the resilience, struggles, secret love, and tragic fall of Jaya’s pioneering grandmother during the British occupation. Through her courageous grandmother’s arrestingly romantic and heart-wrenching story, Jaya discovers the legacy bequeathed to her and a strength that, until now, she never knew was possible.”

My Book Review:

Learning of Jaya’s heartbreaking miscarriage and subsequent demise of her marriage grasps at the heartstrings. I have four children now, but have experienced miscarriage, and it’s so hard. And I could see how not knowing your family’s past would probably make you feel like a part of you was missing. I thought her abrupt decision to travel to India was a knee-jerk reaction, but if you can, why not?

Jaya is a good character. She’s well written and usually realistic. She is quick to react and slow to recover, but I do know a few people like that. Ravi is an interesting character. As the reader you really feel for him in the beginning because life isn’t fair in his circumstances. Amisha’s character is interesting. Sometimes I got her and sometimes I didn’t. Some of her choices made me cringe.

While I was reading this book, I was enthralled. I loved the writing style and got sucked right into the story. Both Jaya and Amisha were mostly relatable and sympathetic. I also enjoyed learning about India now and India during the British occupation. Learning about the caste system intrigued me and made me want to know more about it. I read the book very quickly and loved it.

Then I started thinking about it. In the moment I didn’t really think through some things because I was so enthralled. After, though, as I thought about a few of the situations and events, they didn’t make a lot of sense. There were some big inconsistencies throughout the book. Technology seemed to come and go, the caste system also seemed to come and go, and certain improprieties were completely disregarded.

Then there was the ending. I did not like the ending. There were several ways the author could have gone, and this one was my least favorite. I thought it was presumptuous and unrealistic. I, honestly, couldn’t picture it happening that way. I was so sad because I had enjoyed the rest of the book. Overall, I loved this book in the moment. The writing just sucks you right in. After I thought about it for a few days I realized that there were some inconsistencies, but I still liked it. I didn’t love the ending, but life doesn’t always take the turn you want it to, so it was ok.

Content Rating RRating: R (There’s not really any profanity, but there are a few “intimacy” scenes. Some of them are more descriptive than others. There is a little bit of violence with beatings and domestic violence.)

Recommendation: Adult

My Rating: 3.5/5

 

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2CtcCKT

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

The Lost Family by Jenna Blum Lilli de Jong by Janet Benton  Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
 

Review of Promises and Primroses by Josi S. Kilpack

Promises and Primroses by Josi Kilpack

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Book Review of Promises and Primroses by Josi S. Kilpack

I always get excited when I hear that Josi Kilpack has another book out! She has such a fun writing style, and is good at allowing the reader into the hearts and minds of her characters. She has written about a wide variety of characters in different settings, and they always seem to become some of my best friends. When I heard about this new book I may have done a little happy dance. The cover art is beautiful, the title is fun with alliteration, and I couldn’t wait to meet the characters and delve into this world of primroses. So what did I think? Find out in my book review of Promises and Primroses by Josi S. Kilpack.

Blurb:

“Lord Elliott Mayfield has done his best to take care of his family, first his siblings and now his nieces and nephews. Unfortunately, he sees this new generation moving in the same direction of bad matches and scandalous relationships as the last. In hopes to change their course, he establishes a ‘marriage campaign’ to motivate them to improve themselves through making respectable matches. With his heart in the right place, what could possibly go wrong?

Peter, Elliott’s eldest nephew, thinks the entire idea is ridiculous. A widower with two young daughters, he simply needs a governess, not a wife. Julia Hollingsworth certainly has the credentials and the experience, but is altogether too young and pretty for such a job. So why can’t he stop thinking about her?

Julia loves working as a governess, despite the objections of her mother, Amelia. And as it turns out, Amelia has a lot to say about the Mayfield men—none of it good. But Julia dismisses the rumors of ruined reputations and instead concentrates on helping Peter with his children and his fledgling business in canine husbandry. His kindness and gentleness is endearing—and increasingly attractive.

But Amelia, whose heart was broken thirty years ago by none other than Elliott Mayfield, is determined to prevent any relationship from blooming either between Peter and Julia—or between herself and Elliott.

Hearts and history collide as both couples must face their pasts and decide if risking it all is worth the promise of new love and a new future.”

My Book Review:

Hahaha! Can you imagine your uncle coming to you and proposing that he will give you a very large gift (money or something else) if you decide to settle down and get married to a respectable person? I have to admit that it might be tempting–as long as I already had a fiancée. It might be a little weird otherwise. People just don’t talk like this anymore. Of course parents want their children to marry good people, but thankfully it’s not the same as it used to be. Again, thankfully, women have a lot more options now than they did back then. I’m so glad that times have changed on that one!

I love Julia’s character. She’s so sweet and tenderhearted. I loved how cute she was with the little girls in the story. It was fun to read about the tea parties, the games, and the love she had for them. I liked that she thought independently, she didn’t care what her mother thought, and she did what she thought was best for herself. After learning about Julia’s mother, I don’t blame her for wanting to get out from her mother’s thumb.

Peter seems like a good man. He may be a little too blinded to see what’s important sometimes, but I think he has good intentions. It was interesting learning about the dogs and some of the care that went into them. I know that scandals in families still happen, but thankfully, I don’t think they affect the whole family for generations like they used to. Peter worked very hard to prove himself despite his family’s reputation, and I liked that he put that effort into rising above his circumstances.

I liked the easy-going writing style of this book. It’s well written, has great character development, and is a sweet story. I did think it was a bit predictable and a little cheesy in parts, but honestly, that’s what I want in a romance. Right? Love stories need a little cheese and a few “awwww” moments! It’s fun and entertaining, and I enjoyed it. I liked how it all came together, and how the characters fit together in the story. It’s a fast, easy read; I read it in a couple of days, and loved that I could get sucked into this fun world of promises and primroses.    

Content Rating GContent Rating: G (It’s clean! There’s no profanity, violence, or “intimacy,” except for a few brief kisses.)

Age Recommendation: YA and up

My Rating: 4/5

4 Star Review

Promises and Primroses Blog Tour

 

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2QO44D2

 

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A Heart Revealed by Josi S. Kilpack The Lady of the Lakes by Josi S. Kilpack  Forever and Forever by Josi S. Kilpack
 

Book Review of Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard

Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard

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Book Review of Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard

I have to admit that I have been naïve. I’ve heard of things going on, but I always thought that it couldn’t really be true. People can’t really be that evil, right? It only happens in the movies, right? Unfortunately, it does happen. Too often. And not necessarily in some faraway land; it’s happening all over the world. Children and women are being sold into slavery. But this slavery is a different kind of slavery from what we’ve learned and studied about. These women and children are being sold, yes sold, into human trafficking. It’s absolutely horrifying. Find out more in my book review of Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard.

Blurb:

“In the 1800s American South, Harriet Jacobs is enslaved and tormented by a cruel master. He relentlessly attempts to force her into [an intimate] union, and, when rebuffed, he separates her from her children and spends a lifetime trying to coerce her and then recapture her when she escapes to freedom. Jacobs outwits her tormentor and eventually reunites with her children, works in the cause of abolition and reform, and helps newly freed slaves with education and aftercare.

In 2009, Timothy Ballard encounters a grieving father in Haiti whose three-year-old son has been kidnapped and sold into slavery along with thousands of children who were orphaned after an earthquake devastated the country. He pledges to track down the missing child and leaves his job at the Department of Homeland Security to establish Operation Underground Railroad to infiltrate black markets in human trafficking, liberate victims, and provide a comprehensive aftercare process involving justice and rehabilitation for survivors.

Slave Stealers alternates these two riveting stories, weaving them together to expose the persistent evil of trafficking and sexual exploitation that has existed for centuries—and inspiring us to find a way to end it. Filled with heartbreaks and triumphs, miracles and disappointments, hair-raising escapes and daring rescues, this gripping book provides insight to this terrible evil and the good that can be done when caring people step up and stand in the light.”

My Book Review:

Wow. I read this book in two days. I couldn’t put it down. It pulls at every piece of humanity, motherhood, teacher, Christian, and sister that I have. And then some. I’ve read quite a bit about slavery and the Civil War, and I’m astonished every time by the brutality and inhumane treatment that the slaves endured. It’s incomprehensible. And then I learn that it’s happening today. Yes, today. And not in some place far, far away, but way too close to home. It may look slightly different, but there are many similarities between the transatlantic slavery of old and modern-day slavery.

I loved how Timothy Ballard wove the two stories together. It was seamless. It was powerful. Like everyone, I’ve heard of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglas. I have learned about Abraham Lincoln and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Unfortunately for me, I have not been as well acquainted with Harriet Jacobs. What a story! I loved hearing her story and learning about her. She was an amazing woman who inspires me to never give up, to stand up for my beliefs, and to take a stand against slavery.

Timothy Ballard also has an amazing story. He has seen and experienced so much. I also enjoyed learning about his story. He is such a good example of being a good citizen, of being compassionate, and of being aware of the needs of others. I love that he has dedicated his life to resurrecting the Underground Railroad. He uses many of the same principles today that the people who ran the original Underground Railroad used in the 1800s. His writing style just sucks you into the story. It brings the story to life.

Although old and modern-day slavery are heavy topics, Timothy Ballard does a great job of pulling out the inspirational moments. Instead of feeling weighed down and depressed after reading this book, I absolutely felt inspired. I want to help. I cannot imagine what those children and women have to endure, and Mr. Ballard has such a way with words that he broaches hard things and turns them into teaching moments. His writing is full of energy, it’s authentic, and it is bold. He doesn’t mince words, but it’s not off-putting; in fact, it has the opposite effect.

I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know the modern-day conductors of the Underground Railroad. Their stories are also powerful and vulnerable. It’s very telling how highly Mr. Ballard thinks of them. Once again, it’s inspiring to hear what many of them have overcome, and how they have reacted to those heartbreaking situations.

I loved this book so much! I’m so glad that I had the opportunity to read and review it. I highly recommend Slave Stealers by Timothy Ballard.

Content Rating RRating: R (There isn’t any profanity in this book, but it’s discussing human trafficking and the sexual exploitation of children. It is full of adult themes.)

Recommendation: Adult

My Rating: 4.5/5

4.5 Star Rating

Disclosure: I did receive a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

If you’d like to purchase this book, click here: https://amzn.to/2xdnE2P

 

Slave Stealers Blog Tour

 

Similar Titles You May Be Interested In:

Women of the Blue and Gray by Marianne Monson Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand  the immortal life of henrietta lacks